Giemsa's stain

Giemsa's stain

[gē·em′səz]
Etymology: Gustav Giemsa, German chemist, 1867-1948; Fr, teindre, to dye
an azure dye used as a stain in the microscopic examination of the blood for certain protozoan parasites, viral inclusion bodies, and rickettsia and, more routinely, in the preparation of a smear for a differential white cell count. It is modified and combined with Wright's stain to better detect organisms.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sensitivity of Giemsa's stain (10 of 28) for chlamydia is 35% to Rapid Kit method and PCR Assay method in our study.
The results of Giemsa's Stain for chlamydial inclusion bodies were found positive in 10 cases of the study group accounting for 10% of the infection, while remaining 90 smears were negative for inclusion bodies of the Chlamydia trachomatis, thus indicating a low sensitivity of the urethral samples by Giemsa's stain.
Impression smears were taken from tumor mass, then fixed in methanol and stained with Giemsa's stain.
5 Percent) was prepared by mixing 40 ml working Giemsa buffer, 1 ml Giemsa's stain stock and 20 uL of 5 Percent triton X-100 solution.
Apoptolic damage was analysed by several methods, including Giemsa's stain and morphological observation, Annexin-V stain and flow-cytometric analysis, and study of floating (dead) cell numbers.
The blood smears were stained by Giemsa's stain and examined for blood parasites in erythrocytes under a light microscope.