air hunger

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hunger

 [hung´ger]
a craving, as for food.

air hun·ger

extremely deep ventilation such as occurs in patients with acidosis attempting to increase ventilation of alveoli and exhale more carbon dioxide.
See also: Kussmaul respiration.

air hunger

n.

air hunger

a form of respiratory distress characterized by gasping, labored breathing, or dyspnea.

air hun·ger

(ār hŭng'ĕr)
Extremely deep ventilation such as occurs in patients with acidosis who are attempting to increase ventilation of alveoli and thus exhale more carbon dioxide.
See also: Kussmaul respiration

hunger

[AS. hungur]
Enlarge picture
HORMONES AFFECTING HUNGER
1. A sensation resulting from lack of food, characterized by a dull or acute pain referred to the epigastrium or lower part of chest. It is usually accompanied by weakness and an overwhelming desire to eat. Hunger pains coincide with powerful contractions of the stomach. Hunger is distinguished from appetite in that hunger is the physical drive to eat, while appetite is the psychological drive to eat. Hunger is affected by the physiological interaction of hormones and hormone-like factors, while appetite is affected by habits, culture, taste, and many other factors. See: illustration
2. To have a strong desire.

air hunger

Dyspnea; breathlessness.

air hunger

Deep and rapid gasping respiration of the kind that occurs in severe DIABETIC ACIDOSIS and coma.

air hun·ger

(ār hŭng'ĕr)
Extremely deep ventilation such as occurs in patients with acidosis attempting to increase ventilation of alveoli and exhale more carbon dioxide.
See also: Kussmaul respiration

air

the gaseous mixture that makes up the atmosphere. See also air sacs.

air capillaries
the minuscule vessels that connect the parabronchi in avian lungs, in which there are no blind-ended tubules.
air cell
the air-filled space between the internal and external shell membranes of a bird's egg.
air changes per hour
the standard measurements used to indicate the level of ventilation in a building especially with respect to removal of humidity, noxious gases and carbon dioxide.
air dried
said of feed that is dried in the open with only natural movement of air, e.g. conventional hay. Contains about 10% water.
air filtration
used as a means of reducing contamination inside a building, the efficiency depending on the pore size of the filter. A technique of some value when combined with temperature control in reducing the prevalence of pneumonia in calves in intensive veal producing units.
air flow rates
are important in assessing the suitability of a ventilating system in animal accommodation. Standards for suitable flow rates for different species and age groups for heating and cooling are available.
air gap technique
in radiography, a technique to reduce scatter of radiation by increasing the distance between the patient and the surface of the cassette.
air hunger
a distressing dyspnea affecting both inspiration and expiration which occurs in paroxysms; characteristic of diabetic acidosis and coma. Called also Kussmaul's respiration.
air movement
includes air changes voiding humidity and gases to the exterior plus movements within the space which facilitate cooling.
air passages
the combined air delivery system of the upper and lower respiratory tracts including nasal cavities, pharynx, laryngeal cavity, trachea, bronchi and bronchioles.
air pollution
contamination of the air with deleterious or esthetically unattractive chemical, physical or biological material. Usually reserved for pollutants generated by humans.
air pump
a small electrically driven appliance used to provide a constant stream of air bubbles to aquaria. The bubbles themselves add little oxygen to the water but the constant disturbance of the surface of the water does.
air quality
the determination of air flow rate, temperature, humidity, freedom from bacteria, solid particles, obnoxious effluvia and poisonous gases—especially hydrogen sulfide and methane from sullage pits under the animal accommodation.
air trapping
dilatation of alveoli without destruction of their walls.
air vesicles
extend radially from parabronchi in the lungs of birds and connect with air capillaries, in which gaseous exchange occurs with vascular capillaries.
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She remembers that Chris couldn't even walk across a room without getting winded.
I was getting winded fast, and I knew if I was going to get set to make a shot I was going to have to slow my heart rate.