drug abuse

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abuse

 [ah-būs´]
misuse, maltreatment, or excessive use.
child abuse see child abuse.
domestic abuse abuse of a person by another person with whom the victim is living, has lived, or with whom a significant relationship exists. The abuse may take the form of verbal abuse, sexual abuse, physical battering, or psychological (emotional) unavailability. Abuse is a learned behavior and has an escalating cycle; abusive behavior cuts across all racial, ethnic, educational, and socioeconomic boundaries.
drug abuse see drug abuse.
elder abuse maltreatment of an older adult, ranging from passive neglect of needs to overt mental, physical, or sexual assault.
physical abuse any act resulting in a nonaccidental physical injury, including not only intentional assault but also the results of unreasonable punishment.
psychoactive substance abuse substance abuse.
sexual abuse any act of a sexual nature performed in a criminal manner, as with a child or with a nonconsenting adult, including rape, incest, oral copulation, and penetration of genital or anal opening with a foreign object. The term also includes lewd or lascivious acts with a child; any sexual act that could be expected to trouble or offend another person when done by someone motivated by sexual interest; acts related to sexual exploitation, such as those related to pornography, prostitution involving minors, or coercion of minors to perform obscene acts.
substance abuse a substance use disorder characterized by the use of a mood or behavior-altering substance in a maladaptive pattern resulting in significant impairment or distress, such as failure to fulfill social or occupational obligations or recurrent use in situations in which it is physically dangerous to do so or which end in legal problems, but without fulfilling the criteria for substance dependence. Specific disorders are named for their etiology, such as alcohol abuse and anabolic steroid abuse. DSM-IV includes specific abuse disorders for alcohol, amphetamines or similar substances, cannabis, cocaine, hallucinogens, inhalants, opioids, PCP or similar substances, and sedatives, hypnotics, or anxiolytics. See also drug abuse.

drug a·buse

habitual use of drugs not needed for therapeutic purposes, solely to alter one's mood, affect, or state of consciousness, or to affect a body function unnecessarily (as in laxative abuse).

drug abuse

n.
Inappropriate, illegal, or excessive use of a drug.

drug abuse

the use of a drug for a nontherapeutic effect. Some of the most commonly abused drugs are alcohol; nicotine; marijuana; amphetamines; barbiturates; cocaine; methaqualone; opium alkaloids; synthetic opioids; benzodiazepines, including flunitrazepam (Rohypnol); gamma-hydroxybutyrate; 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy); phencyclidine; ketamine; and anabolic steroids. Drug abuse may lead to organ damage, addiction, and disturbed patterns of behavior. Some illicit drugs, such as heroin, lysergic acid diethylamide, and phencyclidine hydrochloride, have no recognized therapeutic effect in humans. Use of these drugs often incurs criminal penalty in addition to the potential for physical, social, and psychological harm. See also drug addiction.

drug abuse

The widely preferred term for the non-medicinal (“recreational”) use of controlled drugs; in the NHS, the phrase “substance misuse” is preferred.

drug abuse

See Substance abuse.

drug a·buse

(drŭg ă-byūs')
Habitual use of drugs not needed for therapeutic purposes (e.g., such as solely to alter one's mood, affect, or state of consciousness) or to affect a body function unnecessarily (e.g., laxative abuse); nonmedical use of drugs.

drug abuse

The use of any drug, for recreational or pleasure purposes, which is currently disapproved of by the majority of the members of a society. ‘Hard’ drugs are those liable to cause major emotional and physical dependency and an alteration in the social functioning of the user. See also COCAINE, DRUG DEPENDENCE, ECSTASY, HEROIN, MARIJUANA.

drug a·buse

(drŭg ă-byūs')
Habitual use of drugs not needed for therapeutic purposes, solely to alter one's mood, affect, or state of consciousness, or to affect a body function unnecessarily (e.g., laxative abuse).

Patient discussion about drug abuse

Q. If the baby movement is quick, will it be harmful …..? Hi to all here…….I am 24 and 3 week pregnant. I am so happy because pregnancy is vital in every women’s life. I am curious to know when I could feel the baby movement and how it will be. If the baby movement is quick, will it be harmful …..?

A. First, congratulations for Olivia..

You should feel your baby's first movements, called "quickening," between weeks 16 and 24 of your pregnancy. If this is your first pregnancy, you may not feel your baby move until closer to 24 weeks. By the second pregnancy, some women start to feel movements as early as 13 weeks (this varies in every pregnant moms).

So when you reach your second trimester later, you need to monitor your baby's movement sometimes (just like saloni explained to you). Feel free to consult with your OB-GYN doctor whenever you feel a problem with your pregnancy.

But I wish you all the best for your pregnancy. Good luck! Stay healthy always..

Q. Is coffee so harmful? I am Saloni, 17 and a keen coffee-lover. Now-a-days, I drink lot of coffee which my brother has noticed and advised me to minimize the quantity. He also blames coffee for heart diseases and addiction status of the person. Is coffee so harmful?

A. The last response says "coffee is bad for you". This response gives no basis for its conclusion.

Coffee is served in hospitals. If coffee was really bad for you, then hospitals are doing bad things to patients and would have been sued for malpractice. A judge would laugh you right out of court for trying.

There are no FDA health warnings on coffee.

Coffee is served in restaurants everywhere in the world. Its everywhere in the work place. There aren't any rules concerning coffee.


Q. I am going for my first mammography, Is this test harmful? I am going for my first mammography on coming Tuesday…….just was worried as the doctor is suspecting a tumor….Is this test harmful?

A. Generally there is no harm. It may be harmful when you have them during or a week before the menstrual periods as due the tenderness of the breasts may cause discomfort.

More discussions about drug abuse
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As important as a modern is for getting high speed, the telephone equipment through which the modern sends and receives signals is equally critical.
Other opponents, most of them hardly teetotalers, share the conventional prejudice that getting high on pot is somehow morally suspect.
Thomas Richey was jailed in America in 1986 after getting high on LSD and shooting one person dead.
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Dito mostly hangs with a crew of semi-delinquents, getting high and petty criminalizing and fighting with other ethnic groups (although Montiel is of Nicaraguan and Irish heritage, his movie hood's makeup, though never specified, appears to be Italian-American).