gestalt

(redirected from Gestalt theory)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Gestalt theory: gestalt therapy

gestalt

 [gĕ-stawlt´, gĕ-shtawlt´] (Ger.)
form, shape; a whole perceptual configuration.

ge·stalt

(ges-tahlt'),
A perceived entity so integrated as to constitute a functional unit with properties not derivable from its parts. See: gestaltism.
[Ger. shape]

gestalt

/ge·stalt/ (gah-stawlt´) (gah-shtawlt´) [Ger.] form, shape; a whole perceptual configuration. See gestaltism.

gestalt

or

Gestalt

(gə-shtält′, -shtôlt′, -stält′, -stôlt′)
n. pl. ge·stalts or ge·stalten (-shtält′n, -shtôlt′n, -stält′n, -stôlt′n)
A physical, biological, psychological, or symbolic configuration or pattern of elements so unified as a whole that its properties cannot be derived from a simple summation of its parts.

Gestalt

[gəshtält′] pl. Gestalts, Gestalten
Etymology: Ger, form
a single physical, psychological, or symbolic configuration, pattern, or experience that consists of a number of elements and that has an effect as a whole different from that of the sum of its parts.

ge·stalt

, gestalt phenomenon (ge-stahlt', fĕ-nom'ĕ-non)
A perceived entity so integrated as to constitute a functional unit with properties not derivable from its parts.
See also: gestaltism
[Ger. shape]

gestalt

A physical, mental or symbolic pattern or figure so arranged that the effect of the whole differs from, or is greater than, that of the sum of its parts. A unified whole, the full nature of which cannot be grasped by analyzing its parts.

Gestalt

A humanistic therapy technique that focuses on gaining an awareness of emotions and behaviors in the present rather than in the past.
Mentioned in: Group Therapy
References in periodicals archive ?
Belbin (1996) also described the use of continuity in Gestalt theory to guide the spacing and alignment of name placements on a map thus:
As claimed by the Gestalt Theory, the human visual system groups objects by following the "proximity" principle.
Just as Stroebe and Schut (1999, 2001) described complicated grief as a disturbance in the oscillation, Gestalt theory suggests that neurotic regulation occurs when some aspects of one's mental background are not allowed to become figures, that is, when the polarities are not fluid, but rather become hardened dichotomies (Yontef & Jacobs, 2000).
Our perspective of structure is grounded in three themes: (1) structural frameworks such as centralization and formalization occupy a longstanding position in the depiction of organizational life, (2) structural communication processes provide a complementary snapshot of organizational reality, and (3) gestalt theory suggests a natural integration of these two structural dimensions.
Schiller's Gestalt theory of puzzles and jokes is often cited when authors review psychological theories of humor (e.
Wollants seeks to reconnect Gestalt theory to its Berlin School origins, which laid an emphasis on the situation of self-world relations over model-like homeostatic characterizations.