cerebral disconnection syndrome

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cerebral disconnection syndrome

(1) A condition caused by an interruption in the connection between the cerebral hemispheres. While the term dissociative syndrome has been used for this condition, the term cerebral disconnection syndrome is preferable, given that dissociative syndrome is also used in psychiatry.
(2) Any of a number of disorders of language caused by a disruption of association pathways; the anatomic basis for these lesions is uncertain.
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Geschwind Syndrome not only provides a much closer fit with Opicinus's description of his lived reality, but it also positions his intellectual and artistic works as sources of real value to our understanding of late medieval art and cosmology.
24) This paper will revisit the symptoms described above in order to demonstrate the fitness of a diagnosis of Geschwind syndrome.
Walter Heinrichs and art historian Melanie Holcomb have independently suggested that a stroke would account for the principal symptoms of Opicinus's acute illness, but neither connected the possible stroke to the persistent behavioral and neurological changes associated with Geschwind Syndrome.
Just as Opicinus attributed great importance to the new visions he received, patients with Geschwind Syndrome have been observed to attach similar mystical significance to experiences related to their own conditions.
Geschwind Syndrome is not simply associated with a deepened religiosity but a particularly manic mode of religious experience.
Hypergraphic sufferers of Geschwind Syndrome not only produce large quantities of writing, they also frequently display, like Opicinus, tendencies toward obsessively meticulous journal keeping.
Opicinus's description of his hand as executing his entire suite of extraordinarily complex drawings "without human assistance" does not align with any recognized stroke symptom or feature of Geschwind Syndrome.
38) Even the mysterious dysfunction in Opicinus's right hand comports strongly with features of Geschwind Syndrome.
The evidence that Opicinus manifested Geschwind Syndrome resulting from a stroke rather than psychosis is suggestive, perhaps compelling.
One might consider Opicinus as a sufferer of Geschwind syndrome, for instance, in relation to Madeline Caviness's similarly posthumous diagnosis of twelfth century Hildegard of Bingen.
Similarly, I argue that the perspective on Opicinus afforded by Geschwind syndrome facilitates the recovery of Opicinus's authority in the production of his drawings.