gentian

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gentian

 [jen´shan]
the dried rhizome and roots of Gentiana lutea.
gentian violet an antibacterial, antifungal, and anthelmintic dye, applied topically in the treatment of infections of the skin and mucous membranes associated with gram-positive bacteria and molds and also used to treat banked blood drawn from patients in areas endemic for Chagas' disease, to kill trypanosomes in the blood.

gen·tian

, gentian root (jen'shŭn, gen'shŭn rūt),
The dried rhizome and roots of Gentiana lutea (family Gentianaceae), an herb of southern and central Europe; a simple bitter.

gentian

/gen·tian/ (jen´shin) the dried rhizome and roots of Gentiana lutea; used as a bitter tonic.
gentian violet  an antibacterial, antifungal, and anthelmintic dye, applied topically in the treatment of infections of the skin and mucous membranes associated with gram-positive bacteria and molds; also used to treat blood collected in areas endemic for Chagas' disease.

gentian

(jĕn′shən)
n.
1. Any of numerous plants of the family Gentianaceae and especially the genus Gentiana, characteristically having opposite leaves and showy, often blue flowers.
2. The dried rhizome and roots of a yellow-flowered European gentian, G. lutea, sometimes used as a tonic.

gentian

A perennial herb that contains gentiopicrin, gentiamarin, gentisin, gentianose, triterpenes, volatile oil and xanthones.
 
Chinese medicine
Gentian root is anti-inflammatory and antipyretic, and is used to treat cholecystitis, diabetes mellitus, diarrhoea, gallstones, jaundice, and ocular and rheumatic pain. 

Herbal medicine
Gentian is used in Western herbal medicine as a digestive tonic to increase the appetite, peristalsis and flow of bile.
 
Toxic effects
Vomiting.

gen·tian

, gentian root (jen'shŭn rūt)
The dried rhizome and roots of Gentiana lutea (family Gentianaceae), an herb of southern and central Europe; a simple bitter.

gentian (jenˑ·shn),

n Latin names:
Gentiana lutea L.,
Gentiana acaulis L.; parts used: roots, rhizomes; uses: appetite stimulant, digestive ailments; precautions: pregnancy, children; patients with chronic upset stomachs, ulcers, or liver disease; can cause headaches and nausea. Also called
bitter root, bitterwort, feltwort, and
gall weed.

gentian

the dried rhizome and roots of Gentiana lutea; has been used as a bitter tonic.

gentian violet
an antibacterial, antifungal and anthelmintic dye, derived from triphenylmethane; applied topically in the treatment of infections of the skin and mucous membranes associated with gram-positive bacteria and molds, and at one time administered orally for the treatment of pinworm and liver fluke infections in humans. Called also crystal violet, methylrosaniline chloride.
References in periodicals archive ?
This year has already seen an increase in the number of gentians on some parts of the land.
The strikingly blue marsh gentian orchid is found in just a handful of places in North Wales - mainly on Anglesey.
But there is one little gentian I prize above all the others.
As this group of Gentians form low mats perhaps 2ins tall, a slightly raised bed filled with a mix of well rotted cow manure, garden soil and Ericaceous compost would be in order.
Gentians bring out the collector in most gardeners.
They are helping the rare marsh gentian orchid in one of its few locations in Wales, at Penrhoslligwy, on the east coast of Anglesey.
The most popular Gentian is Sino-Ornata, the autumn flowering variety growing to approximately six inches in height by one foot across.
Gentians are really spectacular rock garden plants, particularly the Himalayan G.
But whatever you choose, don't be without a few Gentians, especially Gentiana sino-ornata with its almost mossy foliage and those famously enormous blue trumpet flowers.
Bright-coloured late-flowering gentians, especially Gentian x Macaulayl (left) and Sino-Ornata, make a stunning contrast to autumn- coloured leaves.