polyploidy

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polyploidy

 [pol´e-ploi″de]
the state of having more than two sets of homologous chromosomes.

pol·y·ploi·dy

(pol'ē-ploy'dē),
The state of a cell nucleus containing three or more haploid sets. Cells containing three, four, five, or six multiples are referred to, respectively, as triploid, tetraploid, pentaploid, or hexaploid.
[poly- + G. ploidēs, in form]

polyploidy

/poly·ploi·dy/ (-ploi″de) possession of more than two sets of homologous chromosomes.

polyploidy

[pol′iploi′dē]
the state or condition of having more than two complete sets of chromosomes.

pol·y·ploi·dy

(pol'ē-ploy'dē)
The state of a cell nucleus containing three or more haploid sets. Cells containing three, four, five, or six multiples are referred to, respectively, as triploid, tetraploid, pentaploid, and hexaploid.
[poly- + G. ploidēs, in form]

polyploidy

the state of having more than two sets of homologous chromosomes; that is a multiple of the normal diploid number. Results from replication within a nucleus without nuclear division.
References in periodicals archive ?
Widespread genome duplications throughout the history of flowering plants.
When applied to evolution, these sources of genetic variation do not fit the neo-Darwinian model of slow progressive changes, but are rapid, dramatic, and involve grand molecular events such as whole genome duplication, transposition of large DNA sections leading to massive reengineering of proteins, and horizontal transfer of coding regions from plastids, viruses, and other organisms.
It is now known that common carp genome is allotetraploidized genome which had experienced an additional round of whole genome duplication (WGD) compared with many other teleosts.
Genome evolution and meiotic maps by massively parallel DNA sequencing: spotted gar, an outgroup for the teleost genome duplication.
It has been suggested that a whole genome duplication event has occurred during the evolution of Bivalvia; clams and scallops with 19 chromosomes represent the tetraploid lineage; and oysters with 10 chromosomes represent the diploid lineage (Wang & Guo 2004).
In the path of organic evolution, gene and genome duplication are thought to represent an irreplaceable part and a main source of evolution (Tostivint et al.
We found that paddlefish have had their own genome duplication.
Genome duplication has occurred in the bivalves, but oysters represent the diploid lineage (Wang & Guo 2004).
Even with teleost fishes that have probably undergone an additional round of genome duplication (Jaillon et al.
EP is based on the genome duplication phenomenon that occurs naturally in plants, and is considered as one of the most important evolutionary processes that plants use to adapt to stressful environmental changes.
The first animal to carry them remains unknown, but gene sequencing shows that a modern day invertebrate known as amphioxus "is most similar to the original spineless creature before the two rounds of whole genome duplication," MacKintosh said.
We hypothesize that the ancestral karyotype of Pectinidae (n = 19) is tetraploid and evolved by genome duplication from an ancestral bivalve with a haploid number of about 10, similar to that of Ostreidae (n = 10).