polyploidy

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polyploidy

 [pol´e-ploi″de]
the state of having more than two sets of homologous chromosomes.

pol·y·ploi·dy

(pol'ē-ploy'dē),
The state of a cell nucleus containing three or more haploid sets. Cells containing three, four, five, or six multiples are referred to, respectively, as triploid, tetraploid, pentaploid, or hexaploid.
[poly- + G. ploidēs, in form]

polyploidy

/poly·ploi·dy/ (-ploi″de) possession of more than two sets of homologous chromosomes.

polyploidy

[pol′iploi′dē]
the state or condition of having more than two complete sets of chromosomes.

pol·y·ploi·dy

(pol'ē-ploy'dē)
The state of a cell nucleus containing three or more haploid sets. Cells containing three, four, five, or six multiples are referred to, respectively, as triploid, tetraploid, pentaploid, and hexaploid.
[poly- + G. ploidēs, in form]

polyploidy

the state of having more than two sets of homologous chromosomes; that is a multiple of the normal diploid number. Results from replication within a nucleus without nuclear division.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, it is known that genome duplication is recent for Pisidium species (Lee & O Foighil 2002) and could be a secondary event during the genome evolution of the actual polyploid cytotypes of the genus.
Assuming that rates of chromosomal loss in ferns are comparable to angiosperms, this is fewer genome duplications than expected, as many angiosperms with much lower chromosome numbers have experienced numerous rounds of genome duplications (Cui et al.
It has been suggested that a whole genome duplication event has occurred during the evolution of Bivalvia; clams and scallops with 19 chromosomes represent the tetraploid lineage; and oysters with 10 chromosomes represent the diploid lineage (Wang & Guo 2004).
However, the fact that paddlefish underwent a genome duplication could complicate what its genes tell us about the fin-to-limb transition, said Crow.
Genome duplication has occurred in the bivalves, but oysters represent the diploid lineage (Wang & Guo 2004).
The first animal to carry them remains unknown, but gene sequencing shows that a modern day invertebrate known as amphioxus "is most similar to the original spineless creature before the two rounds of whole genome duplication," MacKintosh said.