Geneva Protocol


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Related to Geneva Protocol: Geneva Convention, Biological Weapons Convention
A document prepared by the League of Nations during the 1925 Geneva Conference, which was intended to ban the use of chemical and biological weapons. The protocol didn’t prevent production, storage or transfer of such weapons, a loophole that was closed in the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention and the 1993 Chemical Weapons Convention.

Geneva Protocol

Global village A document prepared by the League of Nations during the 1925 Geneva Conference intended to ban chemical weapons. See Chemical Weapons, Ypres. Cf Geneva Convention.
References in periodicals archive ?
While there was some discussion within the Foreign Office on trying to prevent Iraq acquiring a chemical weapons (CW) capability, officials noted that it could prove difficult as they were not banned under international treaties, even though their use was prohibited under the Geneva Protocols.
The 1925 Geneva Protocol merely banned the "use in war" of chemical weapons.
Damascus has however signed the Geneva protocol, which bars the first use of chemical and biological weapons, though it does not make stipulations about production, storage and transfer.
Moscow said it "would like to underline that Syria joined" a Geneva protocol on the non-use of such weapons and "presumes that the Syrian authorities will continue to rigorously abide by its assumed international obligations".
The 1924 Geneva Protocol, which called for the pacific settlement of international disputes, such as Japan's "peace" efforts in Korea and China (1910 and 1932, respectively), Italy's in Ethiopia (1935), and Germany's in Austria, Czechoslovakia and Poland (1938, 1938 and 1939, respectively); and
3 [hereinafter Geneva Protocol I] ("The High Contracting Parties undertake to respect and to ensure respect for this Protocol in all circumstances.
One of the Department's smallest offices is tasked with one complicated mission: analyzing and understanding the 1972 Biological and Toxins Weapons Convention and the 1925 Geneva Protocol.
Thank God, this principle, which the British first rejected, was later appreciated by them and has now become the main cornerstone of International Human Rights Law, otherwise known as the Geneva Protocol, of 12 August 1949, and subsequent addition, Protocol (2) of 1977.
50) and Additional Geneva Protocol I of 1977 (Geneva Protocol I), (51) with 167 State Parties.
The Geneva Protocol of 1925 was a no-first-use pledge not to use chemical or biological weapons.
1924 The Geneva Protocol was adopted as a means to strengthen the League of Nations.
The United States finally ratified the Geneva Protocol in 1975.