Geneva Convention

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Related to Geneva Conventions: International humanitarian law

Geneva Convention

 
an international agreement of 1864, whereby, among other pledges, the signatory nations pledged themselves to treat the wounded and the army medical and nursing staff as neutrals on the field of battle.

Ge·ne·va Con·ven·tion

(jĕ-nē'vă cŏn-ven'shŭn),
An international agreement formed at meetings in Geneva, Switzerland, in 1864 and 1906, relating (among medical subjects) to the safeguarding of the wounded in battle, of those having the care of them, and of the buildings in which they are being treated. The direct outcome of the first of these meetings was the establishment of the Red Cross Society.

Geneva Convention

n.
One of a series of agreements first formulated at an international convention held in Geneva, Switzerland, in 1864, establishing rules for the treatment of prisoners of war, the sick, and the wounded.
An international standard first established in 1864 regarding the conduct of the military towards medical personnel, and the obligations of medical personnel during acts of war. The Geneva Conventions consist of four treaties and three additional protocols that set the standards in international law for humanitarian treatment of the victims of war. The singular term Geneva Convention refers to the agreements of 1949

Geneva Convention

Declaration of Geneva Global village A standard established in 1864 regarding the conduct of the military towards medical personnel, and obligations of medical personnel during acts of war. See Helsinki Declaration, Nuremburg Code of Ethics, Unethical medical research. Cf Geneva Protocol.
References in periodicals archive ?
The United Nations Security Council, the United Nations General Assembly, the International Committee of the Red Cross, the International Court of Justice and the High Contracting Parties to the Convention have all affirmed that the Fourth Geneva Convention does apply.
object and purposes of the Geneva Conventions, (42) a view concurred in
A declaration adopted by consensus among 126 of the 196 parties to the Fourth Geneva Convention insists that international humanitarian law must be followed in areas affected by the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians.
In an open letter issued online, the council called upon Burkhalter to "convene a conference of the High Contracting Parties to the Fourth Geneva Convention to discuss Israel's continued non-compliance with the Fourth Geneva Convention.
Today the ICRC acts as the custodians of International Humanitarian Law, as enshrined principally in the four Geneva Conventions of 1949 and their additional protocols.
These questions are rooted in the language of the four Geneva Conventions of 1949.
Russia said it believed that Gadaffi should have been treated as a prisoner of war according to the Geneva Conventions and should not have been killed, its Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said.
Surprisingly, the survey shows that almost half of American youth have never even heard of the Geneva Conventions or international humanitarian law.
3 (5) and Article 3 of the 1949 Geneva Conventions.
The 1949 Geneva Conventions prohibit any "physical or moral coercion", in particular any coercion employed to obtain information.
The Geneva conventions governing the humane treatment of prisoners of war bans "humiliating and degrading treatment", as well as "cruel treatment and torture".
These privileges and protections are rooted in the 1949 Geneva Conventions, perhaps the best known and most widely respected of the international treaties that constitute the law of armed conflict.

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