forward genetics

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forward genetics

Molecular analysis that attempts to identify the gene causing a particular phenotype, which contrasts to “backward genetics”, in which the workers start with a defective gene.
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Importantly, we can carry out and analyze a genetic screen in a period of weeks in a cost-effective manner.
National Cancer Institute (NCI) News Release "RNA Interference Genetic Screen Suggests New Targets for Cancer Therapies", Wednesday, March 29, 2006
Here we describe a genetic screen that can recover mutants in essential genes that are also required during female meiosis.
Fifteen women had both positive lymph node biopsies and positive genetic screens; only one woman had a positive lymph node biopsy and a negative genetic screen, he said.
AMSTERDAM -- A new genetic screen of zygotes performed a few hours after in vitro fertilization has advantages over conventional preimplantation genetic screening, particularly in patients with a very poor prognosis, based on results of the first clinical application of the procedure.
BALTIMORE -- A genetic screen for two metabolic enzymes identified women with ovarian cancer who did not respond to treatment with paclitaxel in a preliminary study with 41 patients.
This is the first time a genetic screen for metabolic enzymes has distinguished patients who respond to cancer chemotherapy from those who don't respond, Dr.
The Cellf(TM) genetic screen gives consumers nutritional guidelines -- based on individual genetic profiles -- to empower individuals to make better health decisions specific to their individual genetic makeup.
Currently, Sciona's products center on the Cellf(TM) genetic screen that gives consumers nutritional guidelines -- based on individual genetic profiles -- to support continued good health.
Used in conjunction with standard diagnostic methods, the new genetic screen for members of FAP-prone families should reduce the need for frequent colorectal exams among those who don't inherit the gene while increasing the chance of identifying those who do, says study leader Malcolm G.
insertional); 3) genetic screens focusing on identifying mutations that affect the structure and function of specific tissue/organ systems; 4) screens focusing on identifying novel developmental genes and pathways, including those mediating sensitivity or resistance to environmental teratogens; 5) screens to analyze the genetic basis of adult phenotypes including behavior, aging, organ disease, cancer, and responses to environmental toxicants, alcohol, and drugs; 6) screens to detect altered gene expression patterns as a tool to identify components of genetic pathways or those altered by environmental agents; and 7) sensitized screens using strains carrying a known mutation to identify extragenic suppressors or enhancers of that mutation.
The sensor could do this at a fraction of the cost of current genetic screens, says Hahm.