Gen Y

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Related to Generation Y: Generation Z

Gen Y

A popular term that describes the demographic cohort following Generation X, which has been variously defined as corresponding to those born between the mid-1970s up to the early 2000s. They are also known as the Echo Boomers, given that many of them are children of baby boomers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Generation Y employees also relish hands-on training and view their employers as a hub of resources, to whom they can turn for honest, direct and fair guidance, as well as for consistent feedback and significant rewards.
To make matters worse, Generation Y is the first generation of young people to have experienced terrorism close to home.
Generation Y leaders collected 700 surveys and published two research reports from them: Higher Learning in 2002 and Rising Higher in 2003.
Generation Y teenagers are also affecting the economy because of their degree of credibility with their parents.
The final results of the generation Y survey may have a slightly different tone once they have been reviewed and weighted, but it is fascinating to get an idea of what's going on inside the heads of the next set of business leaders.
Heeren, Danielle, Land O'Lakes College Talent Specialist, recent college graduate and member of Generation Y suggests that you adjust your communication style based on the generation with whom you're communicating.
Generation Y and work in the tourism and hospitality industry: Problem?
Generation Y is only one of four workforce generations.
Retention of the newly hired Generation Y workforce is critical to the preservation and existence of the civilian government workforce.
This article explores the difference in assigned levels of workplace motivation and happiness between federal government workforce members of Generation Y versus Generation X and Baby Boomers.
The existence of Generation Y is one of the dominant practitioner beliefs of our time (Casben, 2007; Preston, 2007a, 2007b; Sensis, 2007), and is regularly discussed at practitioner conferences and reported in professional journals such as HR Monthly and Human Resources in Australia.