general intelligence factor

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general intelligence factor

Abbreviation: g
The hypothetical common feature identified by all intelligence (IQ) tests. The concept of general intelligence was developed by Charles Spearman, a British psychologist and statistician, who noticed that students who do well in one subject tend to do well in all school subjects and that students who do poorly in one field of study also lag behind in others. He proposed that the general ability to master academic material was due to superior general intelligence and that specific cognitive talents correlated with overall intellectual superiority. This concept, like many others in the field of psychometrics and intelligence testing, is controversial.
See also: factor
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, any set of moderately correlated findings, such as the number of toys and books that individual children have, yields data that can be transformed into a general factor having nothing to do with any "general ability," Schonemann holds.
Much of IQ's predictive power -- which outstrips that of any other single factor researchers have examined, including childhood affluence or poverty -- is captured in a measure known as the general factor of intelligence, or g.
Actual results could differ materially from those currently anticipated in such statements by reason of factors such as changes in general economic conditions and conditions in the financial markets, legal or regulatory decisions or changes, changes in the frequency and amount of insured claims, particularly as a result of changes in mortality and morbidity rates, changes in surrender rates, interest rates, foreign exchange rates, the competitive environment, the policies of foreign central banks or governments, legal proceedings, the effects of acquisitions and the integration of newly-acquired businesses, and general factors affecting competition.
The factors used in the GFCI model include five key areas of competitiveness - business environment, financial sector development, infrastructure, human capital and reputational and general factors.
The volume will be dependent on the clients' budget situation, activities and other general factors and the historical purchase volume must therefore only be perceived as indicative.
The report depicts the general factors that affect prices, and the economic and political reasons that have caused the drop over the past months as well as the limits of impacts on exporter countries and the world markets and economy.
Fourteen chapters discuss applied research in educational and behavioral sciences; scientific research in educational and clinical settings; ethical principles and practices; literature reviews, research proposals, and final reports; general factors in measurement and evaluation; replication; dependent measures and measurement procedures; visual representation of data; visual analysis of graphic data; withdrawal and reversal designs; multiple baseline and multiple probe designs; comparative intervention designs; variations of multiple baseline designs and combination designs; and statistics and single subject research methodology.
The substantial response to the placebo--an effect seen in many studies of depression--suggests that beneficial effects of active treatments partly stemmed from general factors, such as patients' expectations of feeling better after exercising or taking an antidepressant, the researchers say.
However, it does seem to fit within some of the six general factors used to determine whether the primary reason for the early sale is a change of employment, health or unforeseen circumstances.
However the fact that she signed a separate letter addressing the omitted item sufficiently outweighs the general factors.
To understand better the risk of sexual transmission in the context of PHI, it is necessary to consider the general factors that govern such transmission.
Counseling and psychotherapy are effective, Fancher argues, not because of the specific theories or practices of any one of these "cultures of healing," but rather because of general factors which underlie all counseling and psychotherapy.

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