systems theory

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systems theory

a holistic medical concept in which the human patient is viewed as an integrated complex of open systems rather than as semiindependent parts. The health care approach in this theory requires the incorporation of family, community, and cultural factors as influences to be considered in the diagnosis and treatment of the patient.
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introduction of general systems theory to social work in the 1960s, and
The lessons of general systems theory and, in particular, cybernetics might suggest the creation of additional feedback mechanisms and controls to regulate erroneous decisionmaking by criminal justice actors.
Beyond the HACCP principles, the General Systems Theory states that understanding the underlying reasons or system forces that cause things to operate the way they do is vital to any effort to change a system outcome or set point.
In: Ruben, RD & Kin, JY eds 1975: General systems theory and human communication.
Because the NSM is build on general systems theory with the flexibility which allows identification of the client as an individual, family, group or community, use of the NSM is equally appropriate for an interdisciplinary team in a public health department with client as community, an acute care psychiatric hospital with client as an individual or an adolescent drug rehabilitation center with client as family.
The Circumplex Model adopts General Systems Theory as a way to formulate and explain the dynamics of the family, with particular reference to the structures of adaptability, cohesion, and communication (and their associated processes), all of which regulate the amount and quality of interaction adolescents experience with family members and peers.
Unlike the deterministic sciences once favoured by orthodox Modernists, however, the sciences that now aroused such intense excitement and speculation were the postwar new sciences of complex systems - cybernetics and its cousins, information theory, general systems theory and the theory of self-organising systems.
General systems theory and quantum physics offer metalanguage capability and should be recommended to all community agencies.
The section also embraces a discussion of General Systems Theory that distinguishes a doctrinaire, a prioristic approach to the study of science from a pragmatic-pluralistic version, urging the ills of the former and the virtues of the latter.

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