pathology

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pathology

 [pah-thol´o-je]
1. the branch of medicine treating of the essential nature of disease, especially of the changes in body tissues and organs that cause or are caused by disease.
2. the structural and functional manifestations of a disease. adj., adj patholog´ic, patholog´ical.
clinical pathology pathology applied to the solution of clinical problems, especially the use of laboratory methods in clinical diagnosis.
comparative pathology that which considers human disease processes in comparison with those of other animals.
experimental pathology the study of artificially induced pathologic processes.
oral pathology that which treats of conditions causing or resulting from morbid anatomic or functional changes in the structures of the mouth.
speech pathology (speech-language pathology) a field of the health sciences dealing with the evaluation of speech, language, and voice disorders and the rehabilitation of patients with such disorders not amenable to medical or surgical treatment. See also speech-language pathologist.
surgical pathology the pathology of disease processes that are surgically accessible for diagnosis or treatment.

pa·thol·o·gy

(pa-thol'ŏ-jē), Avoid the jargonistic use of this word in the sense of 'disease' or 'abnormality.'
The form of medical science and specialty practice concerned with all aspects of disease, but with special reference to the essential nature, causes, and development of abnormal conditions, as well as the structural and functional changes that result from the disease processes.
[patho- + G. logos, study, treatise]

pathology

/pa·thol·o·gy/ (pah-thol´ah-je)
1. the branch of medicine dealing with the essential nature of disease, especially changes in body tissues and organs that cause or are caused by disease.
2. the structural and functional manifestations of disease.

anatomic pathology  the anatomical study of changes in the function, structure, or appearance of organs or tissues, including postmortem examinations and the study of biopsy specimens.
cellular pathology  cytopathology.
clinical pathology  pathology applied to the solution of clinical problems, especially the use of laboratory methods in clinical diagnosis.
comparative pathology  that which considers human disease processes in comparison with those of other animals.
oral pathology  that treating of conditions causing or resulting from morbid anatomic or functional changes in the structures of the mouth.
surgical pathology  the pathology of disease processes that are surgically accessible for diagnosis or treatment.

pathology

(pă-thŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. patholo·gies
1. The scientific study of the nature of disease and its causes, processes, development, and consequences. Also called pathobiology.
2. The anatomic or functional manifestations of a disease: the pathology of cancer.

pa·thol′o·gist n.

pathology (path.)

[pəthol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, pathos, disease, logos, science
the study of the characteristics, causes, and effects of disease, as observed in the structure and function of the body. Cellular pathology is the study of cellular changes in disease. Clinical pathology is the study of disease by the use of laboratory tests and methods. pathological, adj.

pathology

1. The medical science and specialty dedicated to the study and diagnosis of disease processes, based on analysis of objective parameters–eg, gross examination of tissues, microscopy, chemical and immune-mediated assays, cultures of microorganisms, etc. See Anatomic pathology, Anatomic/clinical pathology, Chemical pathology, Clinical pathology, Comparative pathology, Digital pathology, Immunopathology, Neuropathology, Speech pathology, Stereopathology, Surgical pathology, Telepathology.
2. A term used in working medical parlance for a pathologic lesion.

pa·thol·o·gy

(pă-thol'ŏ-jē)
The medical science, and specialty practice, concerned with all aspects of disease but with special reference to the essential nature, causes, and development of abnormal conditions, as well as the structural and functional changes that result from the disease processes.
[patho- + G. logos, study, treatise]

pathology

The branch of medical science dealing with bodily disease processes, their causes, and their effects on body structure and function. Subspecialties in pathology include MORBID ANATOMY, HISTOPATHOLOGY, HAEMATOLOGY and CLINICAL CHEMISTRY. Practitioners of forensic pathology apply all these disciplines to criminal investigation.

pathology

the study of the structural and functional changes caused by disease.

Pathology

The branch of medicine that looks at abnormal changes in cells and tissues which signal disease.
Mentioned in: Joint Biopsy

pathology,

n the study of the causes and effects of disease, particularly those observable on body tissues.

pa·thol·o·gy

(pă-thol'ŏ-jē) Avoid the jargonistic use of this word in the sense of disease' or 'abnormality.'
Form of medical science and specialty practice concerned with all aspects of disease, but with special reference to the essential nature, causes, and development of abnormal conditions and structural and functional changes that result from disease.
[patho- + G. logos, study, treatise]

pathology (pəthol´əjē),

n 1. the branch of science that deals with disease in all its relations, especially with its nature and the functional and material changes it causes.
n 2. in medical jurisprudence, the science of disease; the part of medicine that deals with the nature of disease, its causes, and its symptoms.
pathology, experimental,
n the study of disease processes induced, usually in animals; undertaken to ascertain the effect of local environmental changes or systemic disorders on particular tissues, parts, and organs of the body. This branch of medical science also attempts to correlate the interaction of local and systemic factors in the production, modification, and continuance of a disease.
pathology, oral,
n the study of the characteristics, causes, and effects of diseases of the oral cavity and associated structures.
pathology, speech,
n the study and treatment of the aspects of functional and organic speech defects and disorders.
pathology, surgical,
n the study of the characteristics of diseased tissues and organs removed in the process of surgery.

pathology

1. the branch of veterinary science treating of the essential nature of disease, especially of the changes in body tissues and organs which cause or are caused by disease.
2. the structural and functional manifestations of a disease.

clinical pathology
see clinical pathology.
comparative pathology
that which considers human disease processes in comparison with those of the lower animals.
experimental pathology
the study of artificially induced pathological processes.
oral pathology
that which treats of conditions causing or resulting from morbid anatomical or functional changes in the structures of the mouth.
surgical pathology
the pathology of disease processes that are surgically accessible for diagnosis or treatment.

Patient discussion about pathology

Q. what is the most accurate pathological test to identify the primary source of a cystic mass in the neck? the mass was removed. Pathologist was unable to identify the source and diagnosed the mass as a branchilogic carcinmoa (which is extremely rare, if exists at all). Therefore, I am looking for the most updated test and examinations that can be applied to blocks of the mass and determine their origin (primary source)

A. Pathologic examinaions under a microscope are the most accurate ones there are, and sometimes even they don't help to identify the cell types. I do not have any other ideas on other tests you can do, and I believe you should follow the treatment your doctors will advise you based on this diagnosis they have made.

More discussions about pathology
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1962, he was a professor of general pathology, and from 1966, he was a professor of experimental oncology.
The material is organized in a standard manner, with early chapters devoted to general pathology followed by organ system pathology.
Nuclear Medicine and Pathology Associates is one of the leading general pathology practices in the state of Georgia.
Sections are organized by general pathology and organ system, and the 38 chapters explore neuropathology, lymph nodes, bone marrow, skin, the endocrine system, bones, soft tissue tumors, salivary glands, the mediastinum and thymus, the cardiovascular system, lungs, breasts, reproductive organs, the renal system, kidney, urinary system, prostate, stomach, intestine, pancreas, and liver.
For clinical biochemists, the first one-third of the book covering general pathology as well as those chapters dealing with diseases of blood vessels and the heart, red cells and bleeding disorders, liver, biliary tract, pancreas, and kidney are likely to be particularly helpful.

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