duplication

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duplication

 [doo-plĭ-ka´shun]
1. a doubling; in genetics, the presence of an extra segment of chromosome. See also repeat.
2. the process of copying a radiograph.
3. abnormal doubling of a body part.

du·pli·ca·tion

(dū'pli-kā'shŭn),
1. A doubling.
See also: reduplication.
2. Inclusion of two copies of the same genetic material in a genome; an important step in diversification of genomes, as in the evolution of the (nonallelic) hemoglobin chains from a common ancestor. Synonym(s): gene duplication
[L. duplicatio, a doubling, fr. duplico, to double]

duplication

/du·pli·ca·tion/ (doo-plĭ-ka´shun)
1. the act or process of doubling, or the state of being doubled.
2. in genetics, the presence in the genome of additional genetic material (a chromosome or segment thereof, a gene or part thereof).
3. abnormal doubling of a part.

duplication

(do͞o′plĭ-kā′shən, dyo͞o′-)
n.
1.
a. The act or procedure of duplicating.
b. The condition of being duplicated.
2. Genetics
a. The occurrence of a repeated section of genetic material in a chromosome.
b. The formation of such a duplication.

du·pli·ca·tion

(dū'pli-kā'shŭn)
1. A doubling.
See also: reduplication
2. genetics Inclusion of two copies of the same genetic material in a genome; an important step in diversification of genomes, as in the evolution of the (nonallelic) hemoglobin chains from a common ancestor.
[L. duplicatio, a doubling, fr. duplico, to double]

du·pli·ca·tion

(dū'pli-kā'shŭn)
1. A doubling.
[L. duplicatio, a doubling, fr. duplico, to double]

duplication,

n the procedure of accurately reproducing a cast or other object.
duplication impression,
n See duplication.

duplication

a doubling; in genetics, the presence of an extra segment of chromosome.

Patient discussion about duplication

Q. what is the cause for double vision

A. Double vision, or diplopia, as it's called, may be due to many conditions, including disorders of the muscles of the eye (extra-ocular muscles) and the nerves controlling them, disorders of the eye ball (enlarged eyeball as in Graves' ), and sometimes disorders of vision.

Diplopia may manifest important conditions, so consulting a doctor (e.g. neurologist or ophthalmologist) may be wise.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003029.htm

Q. I have fibromyalgia and am having terrible vision problems...double, blurred, feel off blance.Is this common?

A. Blurry vision is not a usual symptom in fibromyalgia. If you are experiencing this on a permenant basis you should see a doctor- either a neurologist or an ophthalmologist to rule out other vision conditions that might be causing this.

More discussions about duplication
References in periodicals archive ?
This was true for both the definition of the 11 SNP haplotypes and the phase of gene duplication.
Prevalence of CYP2D6 gene duplication and its repercussion on the oxidative phenotype in a white population.
We developed a single protocol for this preamplification and for the PCR to detect the *5 allele and gene duplication.
Detection of the poor metabolizer-associated CYP2D6(D) gene duplication allele by long-PCR technology.
The combination of the previously developed assays to detect A2637del (CYP2D6*3), G1934A (*4), CYP2D6del (*5), and T1795del (*6) (30) and the assay to detect the gene duplication of CYP2D6 (31) detected six different alleles, which are listed in Table 3.
Our large, high-quality dataset and the naturally high frequency of these gene duplications in Arabidopsis allowed us to make such an analysis for the first time.
These include insertion of repeat sequences, change in expression profile, gene duplication, gene fusion and gene loss or inactivation (9).
Results also supported the theory of genome evolution by partial gene duplication.
The presence of a unique [beta]-actin insertion site (with its tell-tale target site duplications) establishes that one original insertion event was followed by a series of gene duplication events.
Gene duplication in 1 allele was later confirmed by the finding that 17-OH progesterone concentrations were within the reference interval in the amniotic fluid and by fetal echography showing ordinary female external genitalia.
The Sad2 gene has evolved from the most ancient and highly conserved cytochrome P450 family by gene duplication and then diverged from its original role in making sterols to adopt a new function producing an antimicrobial chemical called avenacin.