sexism

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sexism

[sek′sizəm]
a belief that one sex is superior to the other and that the superior sex has endowments, rights, prerogatives, and status greater than those of the inferior sex. Sexism results in discrimination in all areas of life and acts as a limiting factor in educational, professional, and psychological development. sexist, n., adj.
The belief or attitude that one sex is inferior, less competent, or valuable than the other

sex·ism

(seks'izm)
Attitudes and practices that place different values on, or create unequal opportunities for, people because of their gender.

sexism

All of the actions and attitudes that relegate individuals of either sex to a secondary and inferior status in society.
References in periodicals archive ?
This kind of stereotyping is the worst of all the gender stereotypes.
To break down gender stereotypes more needs to be done.
Gender stereotypes -- widely held beliefs about women's and men's supposed characteristics and proper roles -- are ubiquitous and create a deep vein of prejudice that affects the lives of women and men.
Ambassador Eichhorst said: "The European Union has a long track record in the promotion of gender equality and in the fight against gender stereotypes.
Commentators often echo the sentiment that women in politics are subjected to gender stereotypes and are subsequently penalized more for behavior that conforms with those stereotypes than their male counterparts are.
Almost half (46%) of news stories reinforce gender stereotypes, while only 6% challenge them.
Gender stereotypes naturally spill over into career decision-making, where females and males often choose career paths that are "traditional" for their gender.
gender stereotypes and own-based risk preferences influence predictions about other individuals.
A separate study, in which participants were subliminally exposed to a word related to race before reacting to words perceived as masculine or feminine, showed that the association between racial and gender stereotypes exists even at an implicit level.
Designed for children 9-12 years old, the seven-episode cartoon series counters gender stereotypes and sends constructive messages against gender-based violence.