gender role

(redirected from Gender roles)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Gender roles: Gender stereotypes

role

 [rōl]
a pattern of behavior developed in response to the demands or expectations of others; the pattern of responses to the persons with whom an individual interacts in a particular situation.
caregiver role the functions performed by a caregiver; see also under fatigue and strain.
gender role the public expression of gender; the image projected by a person that identifies their maleness or femaleness, which need not correspond to their gender identity.
impaired role the role played by a person who is disabled or chronically ill and who is experiencing a state of wellness and realization of potential commensurate with the condition. Unlike the sick person, the impaired person cannot be expected to “want to get well” but is expected to resume as much normal behavior as is possible.
sick role the role played by a person who has defined himself or herself as ill, with or without validation of the role by health care providers or family members. Adoption of the sick role changes the behavioral expectations of others toward sick persons. They are exempted from normal social responsibilities and not held responsible for the condition; they are obliged to “want to get well” and to seek competent medical help. The sick role also involves behavioral changes, including increased attention to the body and bodily functions, regression (increase in dependent behavior), narrowing of interests, and emotional overreactions.

gen·der role

the public presentation of gender identity; specifically, everything a person says and does that signals to others or to the self that one is male or female (or androgynous). See: sex role, gender identity.

gender role

the expression of a person's gender identity; the image that a person presents to both himself or herself and others, demonstrating maleness or femaleness.

gender role

Sexology The private experience of gender role–GR which is, in turn, the public manifestation of gender identity–GI–a person's individuality as ♂, ♀, or ambivalent, especially re self-awareness, behavior, sexuoerotic arousal & response

gen·der role

(jen'dĕr rōl)
The sex of a child assigned by a parent; when opposite to the child's anatomic sex (e.g., due to genital ambiguity at birth or to the parents' strong wish for a child of the opposite sex), the basis is formed for postpubertal dysfunctions.
See: sex role, sex reversal

gender role

All behaviour that conveys to others, consciously or otherwise, a person's GENDER IDENTITY as male or female.
References in periodicals archive ?
A more recent study of the gender role orientation of athletes was conducted by Lantz and Schroeder (1999).
Gender roles are viewed primarily in terms of their influence on young women's education, work status and potential to become self-sufficient.
A gender role workshop focused on sexism, gender role conflict, and the gender role journey.
Note, however, that some authors refer to gender roles as sex roles, or marital satisfaction as happiness in marriage, among other things.
It is time to renew, or perhaps to start, a real dialogue about the prison of gender roles in which we discuss the reality that both the male and f emale gender roles are imprisoning and ask what we can do to free ourselves as a culture from an obsolete and dysfunctional definition of the male gender role that has become dangerous to human survival even as it has become more entrenched as a cultural ideal for both men and women.
However, the majority of women's activities, particularly in the Gulf region, tend to follow a rather traditional path of gender roles by prioritizing a family welfare agenda and charitable services.
Gender and gender role (as assessed by the Bem Sex Role Inventory) were also considered as mediating variables on the basis of the observation that females often report more anomalous beliefs and experiences than males.
Research indicates that television has a socializing influence on children regarding their attitudes toward gender roles.
FSV women supported nontraditional roles for women, while NV women supported more traditional patriarchal views about gender roles.
Home, school, and playroom: Training grounds for adult gender roles.
But this is only part of a larger fear that no matter what sexuality the child develops, the child might learn that rigid gender roles are not required.
Panelists, who will assess the impact of female rabbis in regard to ideology, theology, gender roles and professional equity, will include Rabbi Amy Eilberg, the first woman ordained by JTS.