Gender Recognition Act 2004

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Gender Recognition Act 2004

A UK law that went into effect in 2005 which allows transsexual people to apply to a Gender Recognition Panel for legal recognition of their chosen gender, which would impact on the person’s rights regarding marriage, parenthood, peerage, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Under the Gender Recognition Act 2004, the sex of transsexual people is now whatever is on their birth certificate and a Gender Recognition Certificate can correct the birth certificate - this is great progress.
THE passing of the Gender Recognition Act, allowing transgender people to be officially recognised has been welcomed.
IT'S said that when the character Hayley made her Coronation Street bow her battle for full legal status and the right to marry as a transgender person helped bring in the 2004 Gender Recognition Act.
Finally, in looking at the politics of the UK Gender Recognition Act (2004) through Judith Butler's poststructuralist lens, Alex Harris' essay critiques the exercise of biopolitical power in the English legal system's treatment of transgendered subjects.
At the High Court this week, Lord Justice Aikens, giving the ruling of the three appeal judges, said that before the Gender Recognition Act, English law had no way of dealing with a person who had changed gender, meaning "once a man, always a man".
Lord Justice Aikens, giving the ruling of the three appeal judges yesterday, said that before the Gender Recognition Act, English law had no way of dealing with a person who had changed gender.
Lord Justice Aikens, giving the ruling of the three appeal judges, said that, before the Gender Recognition Act, English law had no way of dealing with a person who had changed gender, meaning "once a man, always a man".
Although born a man, Prisoner A began the process of gender reassignment while in prison, and in 2006 was granted a certificate under the 2004 Gender Recognition Act which required her to be recognised as a woman "for all purposes".
Another example of the contested nature of transitioned individuals and sports participation that has been manifested in the form of a policy on participation is the United Kingdom's Gender Recognition Act 2004, which states its purpose as being to protect transsexuals' civil rights.
Denise is legally recognised as a woman after having her birth certificate changed as permitted by the Gender Recognition Act 2004.
So far 120 individuals have been granted such a deal under the terms of the Gender Recognition Act 2005.
The gender policy applies to all LGU events and has been drawn up in accordance with the Gender Recognition Act 2004 and the Sex Discrimination Act 1975.