gender role

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role

 [rōl]
a pattern of behavior developed in response to the demands or expectations of others; the pattern of responses to the persons with whom an individual interacts in a particular situation.
caregiver role the functions performed by a caregiver; see also under fatigue and strain.
gender role the public expression of gender; the image projected by a person that identifies their maleness or femaleness, which need not correspond to their gender identity.
impaired role the role played by a person who is disabled or chronically ill and who is experiencing a state of wellness and realization of potential commensurate with the condition. Unlike the sick person, the impaired person cannot be expected to “want to get well” but is expected to resume as much normal behavior as is possible.
sick role the role played by a person who has defined himself or herself as ill, with or without validation of the role by health care providers or family members. Adoption of the sick role changes the behavioral expectations of others toward sick persons. They are exempted from normal social responsibilities and not held responsible for the condition; they are obliged to “want to get well” and to seek competent medical help. The sick role also involves behavioral changes, including increased attention to the body and bodily functions, regression (increase in dependent behavior), narrowing of interests, and emotional overreactions.

gen·der role

the public presentation of gender identity; specifically, everything a person says and does that signals to others or to the self that one is male or female (or androgynous). See: sex role, gender identity.

gender role

the expression of a person's gender identity; the image that a person presents to both himself or herself and others, demonstrating maleness or femaleness.

gender role

Sexology The private experience of gender role–GR which is, in turn, the public manifestation of gender identity–GI–a person's individuality as ♂, ♀, or ambivalent, especially re self-awareness, behavior, sexuoerotic arousal & response

gen·der role

(jen'dĕr rōl)
The sex of a child assigned by a parent; when opposite to the child's anatomic sex (e.g., due to genital ambiguity at birth or to the parents' strong wish for a child of the opposite sex), the basis is formed for postpubertal dysfunctions.
See: sex role, sex reversal

gender role

All behaviour that conveys to others, consciously or otherwise, a person's GENDER IDENTITY as male or female.
References in periodicals archive ?
As social construals, gender norms do not dictate that women perform in a feminine manner or men conversely.
In addition, participants reported on their social and demographic characteristics (age, education, and marital and employment status), attitudes about gender norms (assessed by six items from the Gender-Equitable Men scale), depressive symptoms (assessed by the 10-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale), binge drinking (having five or more alcoholic drinks in a row) in the past 30 days and having been the victim of violence at home or in the community in the past year.
Readers familiar with the history of Spanish America will recognize the gender norms that trapped women of all classes and races (if in different ways) in an interlocking web of constraining religious norms, imperial laws, social expectations, and familial interests.
The question of how Idi Amin's regime reorganized gender norms is a crucial one for the book.
Prime Minister Narendra Modi's Independence Day speech last year emphasised the need to transform India's gender norms.
In its first year, SheKnows Media's #Femvertising Awards have honoured TV clips that challenge the gender norms by building pro-female messages.
In self-categorization theory (Terry & Hogg, 1996) it is also posited that men are expected to conform to gender norms and, therefore, they tolerate more pain than women would.
Stanton's dynamic theory of gender interprets gender norms as 'a normative repertory of [coexisting and conflicting] types' (p.
Not only did Bacall bring sophistication, glamour and, additionally, beauty and eroticism to 1940s Hollywood, she challenged gender norms with a screen persona that offered the image of the contemporary American woman as smart, intelligent and independent.
The study found that addressing gender and power should be considered a key characteristic of effective sexuality and HIV education programmes and specifically identifies some key qualities in programme design--paying explicit attention to gender or power in relationships, fostering critical thinking about how gender norms or power manifest and operate, fostering personal reflection and valuing oneself and recognising one's own power.
Gibson uses poetry to discuss such issues as gender norms, bullying, sexuality, white privilege, social reform and LGBTQ struggles.
This is a 27-item measure of attitudes toward gender norms in the domains of sexual and reproductive health, parenting and sexuality (Pulerwitz & Barker, 2008).