gender role

(redirected from Gender norms)
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Related to Gender norms: gender identity, Gender stereotypes, Gender roles

role

 [rōl]
a pattern of behavior developed in response to the demands or expectations of others; the pattern of responses to the persons with whom an individual interacts in a particular situation.
caregiver role the functions performed by a caregiver; see also under fatigue and strain.
gender role the public expression of gender; the image projected by a person that identifies their maleness or femaleness, which need not correspond to their gender identity.
impaired role the role played by a person who is disabled or chronically ill and who is experiencing a state of wellness and realization of potential commensurate with the condition. Unlike the sick person, the impaired person cannot be expected to “want to get well” but is expected to resume as much normal behavior as is possible.
sick role the role played by a person who has defined himself or herself as ill, with or without validation of the role by health care providers or family members. Adoption of the sick role changes the behavioral expectations of others toward sick persons. They are exempted from normal social responsibilities and not held responsible for the condition; they are obliged to “want to get well” and to seek competent medical help. The sick role also involves behavioral changes, including increased attention to the body and bodily functions, regression (increase in dependent behavior), narrowing of interests, and emotional overreactions.

gen·der role

the public presentation of gender identity; specifically, everything a person says and does that signals to others or to the self that one is male or female (or androgynous). See: sex role, gender identity.

gender role

the expression of a person's gender identity; the image that a person presents to both himself or herself and others, demonstrating maleness or femaleness.

gender role

Sexology The private experience of gender role–GR which is, in turn, the public manifestation of gender identity–GI–a person's individuality as ♂, ♀, or ambivalent, especially re self-awareness, behavior, sexuoerotic arousal & response

gen·der role

(jen'dĕr rōl)
The sex of a child assigned by a parent; when opposite to the child's anatomic sex (e.g., due to genital ambiguity at birth or to the parents' strong wish for a child of the opposite sex), the basis is formed for postpubertal dysfunctions.
See: sex role, sex reversal

gender role

All behaviour that conveys to others, consciously or otherwise, a person's GENDER IDENTITY as male or female.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mental health clinicians who work with Gender Independent young people are careful to note that not all youth who challenge gender norms will want or need to transition, yet for some, it is necessary (Ehrensaft, 2012; Menvielle, 2012).
Calling someone gay-related names as a response to the violation of gender norms (first reason) was assessed by six questions asking whether the participants had ever called a boy/girl these names because they did something that was feminine/masculine or "girly"/"boyish," because they said something that was not very masculine/feminine, or because they behaved in a way in which boys/girls should not behave.
The weak girl, the strong girl and the boy are not all-encompassing concepts but rather describe the ways in which street girls deal with, challenge and shape gender norms.
Sex-based classifications within marriage law, gender norms, and
Adherence to masculine norms was positively associated with participants' physiological fear/avoidant responses to a video of a man violating masculine gender norms by expressing vulnerable negative affect (crying, asking for help, showing affection for another man).
Reading Orlando based on Butler's poststructuralist concept of gender difference, Orlando's sex changes not only expose the way gender norms are internalized and constructed as natural, but also affirm the possibility of a "self-willed" gender performance that could transgress the boundaries of gender differences regulated by compulsory heterosexuality.
Gender norms are some of the strongest social influences shaping men's and women's lives.
This disorder goes beyond not conforming to gender norms and includes children who are very bothered by their physical gender and identify as the opposite sex.
Central to my project is the idea, for which I argue below, that gender norms oppress both women and men, and they would do so even if they were to leave men and women equally well off overall.
In chapter rive, Buddle shows that because women were deviating from gender norms by simply engaging in business, they felt compelled to display femininity in their appearance and public life.
Underlying both adverse health outcomes and gender based violence (GBV) are inequitable gender norms that shape expectations regarding individual behaviours of men and women, as well as the interactions between and among them.
Thus, for example, two staples of gay male culture are the Radical Faeries, who repudiate traditional gender norms and embrace androgynous imagery and values, and the bear community, which celebrates traditionally masculine styles and pursuits while eschewing effeminacy.