gender role

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role

 [rōl]
a pattern of behavior developed in response to the demands or expectations of others; the pattern of responses to the persons with whom an individual interacts in a particular situation.
caregiver role the functions performed by a caregiver; see also under fatigue and strain.
gender role the public expression of gender; the image projected by a person that identifies their maleness or femaleness, which need not correspond to their gender identity.
impaired role the role played by a person who is disabled or chronically ill and who is experiencing a state of wellness and realization of potential commensurate with the condition. Unlike the sick person, the impaired person cannot be expected to “want to get well” but is expected to resume as much normal behavior as is possible.
sick role the role played by a person who has defined himself or herself as ill, with or without validation of the role by health care providers or family members. Adoption of the sick role changes the behavioral expectations of others toward sick persons. They are exempted from normal social responsibilities and not held responsible for the condition; they are obliged to “want to get well” and to seek competent medical help. The sick role also involves behavioral changes, including increased attention to the body and bodily functions, regression (increase in dependent behavior), narrowing of interests, and emotional overreactions.

gen·der role

the public presentation of gender identity; specifically, everything a person says and does that signals to others or to the self that one is male or female (or androgynous). See: sex role, gender identity.

gender role

the expression of a person's gender identity; the image that a person presents to both himself or herself and others, demonstrating maleness or femaleness.

gender role

Sexology The private experience of gender role–GR which is, in turn, the public manifestation of gender identity–GI–a person's individuality as ♂, ♀, or ambivalent, especially re self-awareness, behavior, sexuoerotic arousal & response

gen·der role

(jen'dĕr rōl)
The sex of a child assigned by a parent; when opposite to the child's anatomic sex (e.g., due to genital ambiguity at birth or to the parents' strong wish for a child of the opposite sex), the basis is formed for postpubertal dysfunctions.
See: sex role, sex reversal

gender role

All behaviour that conveys to others, consciously or otherwise, a person's GENDER IDENTITY as male or female.
References in periodicals archive ?
Butler debunks the myth of heterosexual normativity by pointing out the "constructedness," as well as the theatrical effects of gender norms, "what we take to be an 'internal' feature of ourselves is one that anticipate and produce through certain bodily acts, at an extreme, and hallucinatory effect of naturalized gestures" (Pawlowski xvi).
The solution, little as the modern reader may like to admit it, is for Emma to conform more fully to the gender norms for women of the time: she must attend more diligently to "a habit of self-command .
Such a difficulty does not mean that individuals are no longer exposed to gender norms, but, rather, that several norms coexist in the social world.
99) A gender-based harassment theory needs to address the disturbing problem that courts might use a gender norm-based analysis and yet attach a specific intent requirement or misinterpret what suffices as enforcement of a gender norm.
For example, 83% of the participants reported that the program helped them to learn how masculine gender norms enhanced or hindered their leadership attitudes and skills (Objective 2).
Having to balance resistance and conformity to dominant gender norms is not necessarily a bad thing, since in the process women can experience agency; however, it must not be overlooked that such agency is experienced in a cultural context where constraint is also an issue (George, 2005; Kolnes, 1992; Cox & Thompson, 2000; Bremner, 2002).
Prime Minister Narendra Modi's Independence Day speech last year emphasised the need to transform India's gender norms.
Although gender norms are shifting, their influence continues to shape many aspects of women's and men's lives.
The study found that addressing gender and power should be considered a key characteristic of effective sexuality and HIV education programmes and specifically identifies some key qualities in programme design--paying explicit attention to gender or power in relationships, fostering critical thinking about how gender norms or power manifest and operate, fostering personal reflection and valuing oneself and recognising one's own power.
Kabul: With a hint of swagger, Afghanistan's first female pilot since the fall of the Taliban is defying death threats and archaic gender norms to infiltrate what is almost entirely a male preserve.
Due to deep-rooted gender norms, they are more likely to have their rights trampled upon than their sons, brothers and fathers.