gender role

(redirected from Gender norm)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

role

 [rōl]
a pattern of behavior developed in response to the demands or expectations of others; the pattern of responses to the persons with whom an individual interacts in a particular situation.
caregiver role the functions performed by a caregiver; see also under fatigue and strain.
gender role the public expression of gender; the image projected by a person that identifies their maleness or femaleness, which need not correspond to their gender identity.
impaired role the role played by a person who is disabled or chronically ill and who is experiencing a state of wellness and realization of potential commensurate with the condition. Unlike the sick person, the impaired person cannot be expected to “want to get well” but is expected to resume as much normal behavior as is possible.
sick role the role played by a person who has defined himself or herself as ill, with or without validation of the role by health care providers or family members. Adoption of the sick role changes the behavioral expectations of others toward sick persons. They are exempted from normal social responsibilities and not held responsible for the condition; they are obliged to “want to get well” and to seek competent medical help. The sick role also involves behavioral changes, including increased attention to the body and bodily functions, regression (increase in dependent behavior), narrowing of interests, and emotional overreactions.

gen·der role

the public presentation of gender identity; specifically, everything a person says and does that signals to others or to the self that one is male or female (or androgynous). See: sex role, gender identity.

gender role

the expression of a person's gender identity; the image that a person presents to both himself or herself and others, demonstrating maleness or femaleness.

gender role

Sexology The private experience of gender role–GR which is, in turn, the public manifestation of gender identity–GI–a person's individuality as ♂, ♀, or ambivalent, especially re self-awareness, behavior, sexuoerotic arousal & response

gen·der role

(jen'dĕr rōl)
The sex of a child assigned by a parent; when opposite to the child's anatomic sex (e.g., due to genital ambiguity at birth or to the parents' strong wish for a child of the opposite sex), the basis is formed for postpubertal dysfunctions.
See: sex role, sex reversal

gender role

All behaviour that conveys to others, consciously or otherwise, a person's GENDER IDENTITY as male or female.
References in periodicals archive ?
Eventually, participants see that gender norms have been taught.
Agarwal (1994), Kabeer (1995) and Moser (1993) all provide convincing evidence of women's groups that operate as powerful 'institutional entrepreneurs', challenging and weakening the application of traditional gender norms and expanding the domain of free human choice.
Because such cultural or societal norms frequently creep into courts' decisions,(105) it is unclear whether they are willing or able to identify a gender norm when they see one.
Based on these observations, it is expected that endorsement of traditional gender norms will be related to lower sexual resourcefulness and greater compliance to unwanted sex.
In addition, participants reported on their social and demographic characteristics (age, education, and marital and employment status), attitudes about gender norms (assessed by six items from the Gender-Equitable Men scale), depressive symptoms (assessed by the 10-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale), binge drinking (having five or more alcoholic drinks in a row) in the past 30 days and having been the victim of violence at home or in the community in the past year.
The primary purpose of the study was to determine if individual differences in masculine gender socialization (as measured by conformity to hegemonic masculine norms and masculine gender role stress) are associated with men's psychophysiological responses to expressions of negative affect that violate masculine gender norms.
Another study carried out in Tanzania (Schuler et al,2009)to examine the role of gender norms in decision making among young married women and men on issues of family planning and contraceptive use; reported that gender factors such as men's dominance in decision-making and cultural norms that condone a man beating his wife if she uses contraceptives secretly are barriers to use of modern contraceptives.
one way to explain why is by assuming that people become double shifters as a result of adapting their preferences to fit gender norms and to avoid other types of hardship.
Boys and girls in the intervention schools, particularly with classroom sessions, were less supportive of inequitable gender norms, whereas no change, less change or negative change was observed in the control group.
Thus, in some societies there is actually increased risk of violence for some women until a sufficient number of them reach a high enough educational level and gender norms shift to allow its protective effects to operate.
Steven Pierce, in "Identity, Performance, and Secrecy: Gendered Life and the 'Modern' in Northern Nigeria," examines the dynamic ways in which Hausa inhabitants of Kano and Ungogo, Northern Nigeria, use discretion and mutual tolerance to work around the strictures and gender norms of the Islamic state in which they now live.
The unpleasant, daily experience of negotiating gender norms, somethingthing most people take for granted, is a site of political action for Coble.