gender

(redirected from Gender expression)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Gender expression: gender identity

gender

 [jen´der]
sex (def. 1); see also gender identity and gender role.
gender identity disorder a disturbance of gender identification in which the affected person has an overwhelming desire to change their anatomic sex or insists that they are of the opposite sex, with persistent discomfort about their assigned sex or about filling its usual gender role; the disorder may become apparent in childhood or not appear until adolescence or adulthood. Individuals may attempt to live as members of the opposite sex and may seek hormonal and surgical treatment to bring their anatomy into conformity with their belief (see transsexualism). It is not the same as transvestism.

gen·der

(jen'dĕr),
Category to which an individual is assigned by self or others, on the basis of sex. Compare: sex, gender role.

gender

/gen·der/ (jen´der) sex; the category to which an individual is assigned on the basis of sex.

gender

(jĕn′dər)
n.
1. Grammar
a. A grammatical category, often designated as male, female, or neuter, used in the classification of nouns, pronouns, adjectives, and, in some languages, verbs that may be arbitrary or based on characteristics such as sex or animacy and that determines agreement with or selection of modifiers, referents, or grammatical forms.
b. The fact of being classified as belonging to such a category: agreement in gender, number, and case.
2.
a. Either of the two divisions, designated female and male, by which most organisms are classified on the basis of their reproductive organs and functions; sex.
b. One's identity as female or male or as neither entirely female nor entirely male.
c. Females or males considered as a group: Students lined up with the genders in different lines.
tr.v. gen·dered, gen·dering, gen·ders Archaic
To engender.

gen′der·less adj.

gender

[jen′dər]
Etymology: L, genus, kind
1 the classification of the sex of a person into male, female, or ambivalent.
2 the specific sex of a person. See also sex.

gender

The sex with which a person identifies him- or herself.

gender

Sex; one's personal, social, and legal status as ♂ or ♀, based on body and behavior, not on genital and/or erotic criteria. See Gender-identity/role.

gen·der

(jen'dĕr)
Category to which a person is assigned by self or others, on the basis of sex.
Compare: sex, gender role
[fr. L. genus, kind]

gender

A classification of organisms based on their sex. From the Latin genus , a kind.

gender

(1) in general use, synonym for biological sex; (2) the socially constructed views of feminine and masculine behaviour within individual cultural groups. gender identity a person's sense of their biological sex. gender role the set of behaviours, attitudes and other characteristics normally associated with masculinity and femininity within a given culture or social group; for example, certain sports are stereotypically viewed as reflecting a masculine role (e.g. basketball) whereas others reflect a feminine role (e.g. netball).

gender

anatomical sex of the individual

gender

sex; the category to which an individual is assigned on the basis of sex.

Patient discussion about gender

Q. In which month of pregnancy it's possible to determine gender of the fetus?

A. following marin's question - is there a difference when it comes to twins?

Q. Which gender is on the high risk of fibromyalgia and what may be the cause?

A. It’s generally found with women. Any women having family history of fibromyalgia is more likely to suffer from fibromyalgia. Causes are unknown. Factors known to cause are that some people with rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and spinal arthritis may be more likely to have fibromyalgia, too. Researchers suspect that some genes may stimulate pain in patients with fibromyalgia though there is no proof to that effect.

More discussions about gender
References in periodicals archive ?
This activity is a form of gender expression, and not done for entertainment purposes.
Some interviewees use the term metrosexual to describe their increased fluidity in gender expression, others use it as a euphemism for bisexuality, and still others use it to describe a heterosexual male who dabbles in same-sex sex.
changes in legal and payroll documents, discrimination based on gender expression, affirmative action/policy).
Armed Forces who are threatened with investigation and discharge or are discriminated against because of their actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity or militarily appropriate gender expression.
Gender expression was defined as "the way a person publicly shows one's gender identity through clothing, speech, body language, wearing of make-up and/or accessories and other forms of displaying masculinity or femininity.
At the same time, our language needs to reflect the fluidity and complexity of sexuality and gender expressions in everyday life and their intricate interweaving with other conditions such as class, race, ethnicity, time and place.
Unraveling Gender Expression in Osmunda cinnamomea: Implications for Fern Evolution.
Exogenous cytokinin did not accelerate the rate of reproductive maturation in this study; however, the possibility of a delay in reproductive maturity or effects on gender expression and reproductive effort (gametangia per unit thallus area) were not explored.
This bill also requires an employer to allow an employee to appear or dress consistently with the employee's gender expression.
School staff aren't always providing the necessary support; some transgender youth reported hearing disparaging remarks coming directly from school staff (GLSEN, 2009; McGuire & Conover-Williams, 2010), and stated that teachers and school authorities were less likely to intervene for sexual orientation or gender expression harassment than for other types of harassment (GLSEN, 2009).
Gender expression refers to all of the ways that people express their gender (or gender identity) to the outside world, such as dress, appearance, and behavior.
Given idiosyncratic limitations and the specificity of the sample, it is all the more surprising that differences in the degree a woman was out at work was related to commitment and that gender expression was also an integral part of our findings.

Full browser ?