gemmule

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gemmule

 [jem´ūl]
1. a reproductive bud, the immediate product of gemmation.
2. any of the little spinelike processes on the dendrites of a nerve cell.

gem·mule

(jem'yūl),
1. A small bud that projects from the parent cell, and finally becomes detached, forming a cell of a new generation.
2. Synonym(s): dendritic spines
[L. gemmula, dim. of gemma, bud]

gemmule

/gem·mule/ (jem´ūl)
1. a reproductive bud; the immediate product of gemmation.
2. one of the many little spinelike processes on the dendrites of a neuron.

gemmule

(jĕm′yo͞ol)
n.
1. A small gemma or similar structure, especially a reproductive structure in certain sponges that remains dormant for some time and later develops into a new individual.
2. A hypothetical particle in the theory of pangenesis, postulated to be produced by cells and to be responsible for transmitting traits from parent to offspring.

gem′mu·lif′er·ous (jĕm′yo͞o-lĭf′ər-əs) adj.

gemmule

See gemma.

gem·mule

(jem'yūl)
1. A small bud that projects from the parent cell, and finally becomes detached, forming a cell of a new generation.
2. Synonym(s): dendritic spines.
[L. gemmula, dim. of gemma, bud]

gemmule

a bud formed in sponges as an internal group of cells that gives rise to a new sponge after overwintering (in freshwater forms) and the decay of the parent.

gemmule

1. a reproductive bud; the immediate product of gemmation.
2. any of the little spinelike processes on the dendrites of a nerve cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
Darwin suggested that the gemmules were physical entities and that, as such, other scientists could look for them or for their effects.
It is likely that pangenesis lasted longer than it might have otherwise because the proposed gemmules were thought to be too small to be seen with the microscopes of Darwin's time.
The fact that the species is more abundant in the lentic compartment of the reservoir, is seasonal, and does not present gemmules indicates that the occupation is being carried out by gemmules produced in the upper reaches of the tributaries that are carried by the flow to downstream regions, and accumulate precisely in the compartments with less flow.
It is precisely at this moment, during the reduction in the energy of the circulating water, that the gemmules suspended in the water column in the ducts have the opportunity to adhere to the walls.
Considering the above-mentioned factors, the HPS lakes situated in tropical and sub-tropical areas of South America seem to offer an ideal situation for tests about the cultivation of freshwater sponges, with the dual aim of further investigating their industrial application and develop management methods to reduce encrustations in pipes and turbines in HPSs, using either gemmules imported from upstream or produced in the reservoir itself.
Diapausing gemmules were collected from Stony Brook in South Hadley, Massachusetts, in late September of 1993 and maintained at 4 [degrees] C until early October when calorimetry was performed (storage for 2 weeks at 4 [degrees] C is insufficient time to break diapause).
Experiments were initiated by filtering vernalized gemmules from the 4 [degrees] C storage water and placing them into 20 [degrees] C stream water that was continuously bubbled with air.
Heat dissipation and oxygen consumption of gemmules were measured simultaneously with an LKB 2277 thermal activity monitor coupled via stainless steel tubing to a twin-flow respirometer (Cyclobios, Innsbruck, Austria) (Gnaiger, 1983a).
Pangenesis could prevent swamping because gemmules might reproduce themselves after being released from an organ, making it possible for a few changed gemmules to "become sufficiently numerous to overpower and supplant the old [existing] gemmules" (Darwin, 1868b, p.
Darwin's half cousin Francis Galton (often called the father of eugenics) conducted a series of experiments to test the notion that gemmules moved throughout the body to transmit information to the gametes.
Germination of gemmules represents the period of development leading from post-diapause quiescence to the differentiated adult sponge.
Gemmules used in the enzyme studies were collected from Stony Brook in South Hadley, Massachusetts, during early February of 1992.