gemination

(redirected from Geminate consonant)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.
Related to Geminate consonant: Consonant length

gem·i·na·tion

(jem'i-nā'shŭn),
Embryologic partial division of a primordium. For example, gemination of a single tooth germ results in two partially or completely separated crowns on a single root.
[L. geminatio, a doubling]

gemination

in dentistry, the "twinning" of a single tooth bud. Geminated teeth usually have a single common root, a common pulp canal, and visible partial cleavage of the enamel crown. The normal quantity of teeth are present in the dental arch. Not to be confused with fusion.

gem·i·na·tion

(jem'i-nā'shŭn)
Embryologic partial division of a primordium. For example, gemination of a single tooth germ results in two partially or completely separated crowns on a single root.
[L. geminatio, a doubling]

gem·i·na·tion

(jem'i-nā'shŭn)
Embryologic partial division of a primordium. For example, gemination of a single tooth germ results in two partially or completely separated crowns on a single root.
[L. geminatio, a doubling]

gemination (jem´ənā´shən),

n the formation of two teeth from a single tooth germ.

gemination

the abnormal tooth formation as a result of an unsuccessful attempt at forming two separate teeth. There is usually a longitudinal groove.
References in periodicals archive ?
For transcription, we adopt the symbols of the IPA; and [-CC-] for the geminate consonants in accordance with Crystal (2003: 196) who proposes the use of [:] for length or long consonant as in [p:] and [-CC-] as in [-pp-] for double consonants or geminates.
A good number of these geminate consonants could be said to have their nongeminate counterparts that are already well-established as phonemes in the dialect.
Hence the use of qoutation marker in the word 'geminate' in the title since they seem not to behave like geminate consonants identified in different languages in the literature.
The data are presented in tabular form with the first column representing the words from which the geminate consonants are derived.
Ladefoged (1975) considers geminate consonants as a class of long consonants.
Trubetzkoy (1969) believes that geminate consonants occur in many languages of the world and discusses the gemination from a functional point of view.
Such a representation has subsequently been the received analysis of geminate consonants, including post-lexical geminates.
There are geminate consonants in the language, but for several reasons, we have decided that this does not constitute evidence for contrastive quantity.