genetically modified food

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Any food genetically modified to resist or tolerate pesiticides, insects, or viruses, or to decrease spoilage, produce antibodies, decrease fatty acid synthesis, or increase production of certain amino acids

ge·net·i·cal·ly mod·i·fied food

(jĕ-net'ik-ă-lē mod'i-fīd fūd)
Scientifically altered foodstuffs intended to limit exposure of the plants or animals to disease or spoilage. Concerns about safety and efficacy have been raised worldwide.
Synonym(s): frankenfood.

genetically modified food

Any crop or agricultural product altered by biological engineering for drought resistance, increased growth, resistance to pests or pesticides, prolonged shelf-life, altered textures or flavors, or other economically or commercially desirable characteristics. Promoters of genetically modified foods point to their improved yields (which may have a beneficial impact on agricultural profits or world hunger). Opponents of genetic modification have raised concerns about its effects on ecosystems, human food allergies, and religious dietary laws.
Synonym: bioengineered food
See also: food
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Join a local environmental group and campaign against GE crops and GE food.
New Survey Results: Motherhood, Apple Pie and GE Food Labeling
With evidence mounting of a GE food system out of control, the Organic Trade Association encourages the U.
Some Ways to Inform & Organize People around GE Food
Health Ministers now appear ready to exempt a wide range of refined GE food products from labelling, against the weight of scientific and public opinion.
But Labour is not committed to a moratorium on growing or selling GE food.
No study on the long-term effects of GE food had been done either.
It is easy to see how unsuspecting consumers in America have been kept in the dark about GE food and why the biotech industry has grown significantly, even though evidence or scientific consensus that GE food is safe for human consumption has never been established.
For the first time, Australia now faces the introduction of GE food crops into its fields and food chain, with the states of New South Wales and Victoria's recent approval of GE canola.
In 2001, FDA proposed to require that GE food developers notify the agency before marketing their products.
The significance of this field trial application is that it would be the first GE food product to be field tralled in Australia that is intended to have directly marketable health benefits for consumers.
In a presentation developed to inform the public and scientific community about the FDA policy, Pelletier points out how inadequately the FDA addresses a number of issues related to GE food production and regulation.