gatekeeper

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gate·keep·er

(gāt'kēp-ĕr),
A health care professional, typically a physician or nurse, who has the first encounter with a patient and who thus controls the patient's entry into the health care system.

gatekeeper

a health care professional, usually a primary care physician or a physician extender, who is the patient's first contact with the health care system and triages the patient's further access to the system.
Managed care
(1) A person, organization, or legislation that selectively limits access to a service; in health care, primary-care physicians—e.g., family practitioners, general practitioners, internists, paediatricians and PROs—and utilization review committees, respectively, function as direct or indirect gatekeepers
(2) A physician who manages a patient’s healthcare services, coordinates referrals, and helps control healthcare costs by screening out unnecessary services; many health plans insist on a gatekeeper’s prior approval for special services, in the absence of which the claim will not be covered
Molecular biology The initial gene mutated in a ‘cascade’ of mutations, leading to the development of a disease

gatekeeper

Managed care
1. A person, organization, or legislation that selectively limits access to a service; in health care, primary-care physicians–eg family practitioners, general practitioners, internists, pediatricians and PROs and utilization review committees, respectively, function as direct or indirect gatekeepers.
2. Care coordinator A physician who manages a Pt's healthcare services, coordinates referrals and helps control healthcare costs by screening out unnecessary services; many health plans insist on a gatekeeper's prior approval for special services or the claim will not be covered.

gate·keep·er

(gāt'kēp-ĕr)
A health care professional, typically a physician or nurse, who has the first encounter with a patient and who thus controls the patient's entry into the health care system.

gate·keep·er

(gāt'kēp-ĕr)
A health care professional, typically a physician or nurse, who has the first encounter with a patient and who thus controls patient's entry into system.
References in periodicals archive ?
The discovery of the gatekeeper cells, which are part of a memory network together with several other nerve cells in the hippocampus, reveal new fundamental knowledge about learning and memory.
The Verizon Foundation received the 2012 Corporate Gatekeepers Award for their long standing support of the arts and community development and Evidence, A Dance Company.
They are very good at training their gatekeepers to cut salespeople off at the pass.
You will stand a better chance of getting through gatekeepers if you let them help you and avoid sounding like a typical salesperson.
Fans will be eager to meet the new Gatekeepers and gallop along on their adventures.
Oddly, considering their influence on customers, gatekeepers, including pharmacists, are mostly overlooked in product development and in many cases the final products are promoted to them only as an afterthought.
Thus, in this study, we expected that the role of gatekeepers as coordinators of care, rather than as controllers of referrals, would be more relevant.
Carole Boston Weatherford and Yvonne Buchanan are gatekeepers.
All these referrals were assisted with their problems, which would have gone unnoticed were it not for the intervention of the Gatekeepers.
For example, gatekeepers may postpone access to critical services which people may need immediately, and may also be unwilling to refer patients to specialists because of utilization limits imposed by the managed care organization.
MCO gatekeepers may deny benefits on the grounds that services aren't "medically necessary".
The study highlighted three distinct mechanisms where the gender of the party gatekeepers was likely to affect whether the local party candidate was a man or a woman: gatekeepers are more likely to directly recruit and promote people like themselves; the professional and social networks of women gatekeepers are more likely to include qualified women who would be suitable parliamentary candidates which increases the opportunities for direct recruitment of female candidates; and the presence of female party gatekeepers sends an encouraging signal to potential female candidates that women are welcome and can be active in politics, creating a virtuous cycle of participation.