gastrointestinal bleeding

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gastrointestinal bleeding

any bleeding from the GI tract. The most common underlying conditions are peptic ulcer, Mallory-Weiss syndrome, esophageal varices, diverticulosis, ulcerative colitis, and carcinoma of the stomach and colon. Vomiting of bright red blood or passage of coffee ground vomitus indicates upper GI bleeding, usually from the esophagus, stomach, or upper duodenum. Aspiration of the gastric contents, lavage, and endoscopy are performed to determine the site and rate of bleeding. Tarry black stools indicate a bleeding source in the upper GI tract; bright red blood from the rectum usually indicates bleeding in the distal colon. GI bleeding is treated as a potential emergency. Patients may require transfusions, fluid replacement, endoscopic treatment, or gastric lavage and are watched carefully so as to prevent shock and hypovolemia. In all patients blood loss is evaluated and ability to coagulate is tested. See also coffee-ground vomitus, hematochezia, melena.

gastrointestinal bleeding

Any hemorrhage into the GI tract lumen, from esophagus–eg, from ruptured esophageal varices, to anus–eg from hemorrhoids

gastrointestinal bleeding

Bleeding from anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract.
Synonym: gastrointestinal hemorrhage
See also: bleeding
References in periodicals archive ?
Analysis of data from 73,863 women enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study II in 1989 showed that current users of menopausal hormone therapy had a 46% increase in the risk of a major gastrointestinal bleed and a more than twofold increase in the risk of a lower GI bleed or ischemic colitis, compared with never users, said Dr.
Monotherapy with prescription nonselective NSAIDs increased the chances of an upper gastrointestinal bleed by 4.
In 2011, HealthGrades gave the medical center 12, five-star ratings (the highest level) in the following areas: heart attack, stroke, pneumonia, gastrointestinal surgery, gastrointestinal bleed, bowel obstruction, cholecystectomy (gall bladder removal) and sepsis (complication of a serious bacterial infection).
Memorial achieved 5 stars for the treatment of heart failure, stroke, pneumonia, sepsis, respiratory failure, gastrointestinal bleed, spinal fusion surgery, and bowel obstruction.
The drug was generally well tolerated with one serious adverse event of an unrelated gastrointestinal bleed, the company said.
Hence immediate risk of a major life-threatening gastrointestinal bleed is significantly relieved.
On January 29, the patient developed an "upper gastrointestinal bleed.
For example, nurses working in an acute hospital, an emergency cardiac chest re-open, a patient collapsed on the floor in a pool of blood due to a gastrointestinal bleed, removing a catheter from a patient or changing a colostomy bag--just some examples to convey what nurses do in an acute hospital.
She had required a 13 unit blood transfusion 5 years ago due to a massive gastrointestinal bleed for which no cause was found, despite extensive investigations.
On average, a 28 percent lower inhospital risk-adjusted mortality was experienced by Medicare patients at Distinguished Hospitals for Clinical Excellence in the following procedures and diagnoses: cardiac surgery, angioplasty and stent, heart attack, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, community-acquired pneumonia, stroke, abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, bowel obstruction, gastrointestinal bleed, pancreatitis, diabetic acidosis and coma, pulmonary embolism and sepsis.
Lau's group has previously reported that omeprazole treatment of patients who underwent endoscopic treatment for an upper gastrointestinal bleed significantly decreased the rate of rebleeding within 30 days, from a rate of 22% in a placebo group to 7% in a treated group (N.
NEW ORLEANS -- As many as 10% of patients with an upper gastrointestinal bleed may also have associated myocardial damage, according to a study in 156 patients.

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