gastric varices


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gastric varices

varices located in the gastric mucosa, most commonly in the cardia and fundus, as a result of portal hypertension, which are prone to ulceration and massive bleeding. Gastric varices are difficult to treat endoscopically and may require TIPS placement.

gas·tric va·ri·ces

(gastrik vari-sēz)
Varices located in gastric mucosa, most commonly in the cardia and fundus, as a result of portal hypertension, which are prone to ulceration and massive bleeding.
References in periodicals archive ?
3%), followed by portal hypertensive gastropathy, esophageal, and gastric varices in agreement with other studies.
Gastric varices were graded according to classification proposed by Sarin et al [19] for gastro-oesophageal varices (GOV) and isolated gastric varices (IGV).
Objective: To find out the frequency of gastric varices in patients with portal hypertension based on endoscopic findings.
Objective: To determine the frequency of different types of gastric varices in patients with hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis.
Injection sclerotherapy for the management of esophageal and gastric varices.
Peptic ulcer disease remains a common cause of Upper GI bleeding when we consider the causes other than esophageal and gastric varices.
In addition to receiving HCV treatment, patients with cirrhosis also need regular liver ultrasound exams to screen for HCC (every 6 months) and esophagogastroduodenoscopy to screen for esophageal and gastric varices.
Numerous gastric varices, porta hepatis and splenic hilum collaterals were noted.
Upper GI panendoscopy revealed isolated gastric varices at the fundus and upper body.
This will allow identification of non-variceal causes of haemorrhage, which occur in 10% of cases, and those who may be bleeding from gastric varices or portal hypertensive gastropathy.