ADH7

(redirected from Gastric alcohol dehydrogenase)

ADH7

A gene on chromosome 4q23-q24 that encodes class-IV alcohol dehydrogenase 7 mu or sigma subunit, which like other alcohol dehydrogenases metabolises various substrates, including ethanol, retinol, other aliphatic alcohols, hydroxysteroids and lipid peroxidation products. ADH7 is inefficient in ethanol oxidation; it is the most active as a retinol dehydrogenase and may participate in synthesising retinoic acid—which is required for cellular differentiation. ADH7 is highly expressed in the stomach.
References in periodicals archive ?
1990) found that gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activities were 70-80% higher in nonalcoholic men than nonalcoholic women which would have a significant impact on how fast alcohol is metabolized.
The role of decreased gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity and first-pass metabolism.
In addition, women possess a smaller amount (approximately 50 percent less) of the alcohol metabolizing enzyme gastric alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) in their stomachs, which allows more unmetabolized alcohol to pass into the bloodstream (Lieber 1997).
Lieber notes, however, that both cimetidine and ranitidine belong to a class of drugs that inhibit gastric alcohol dehydrogenase, an enzyme that metabolizes alcohol.
Ethanol metabolism and aging: The role of "first pass metabolism" and gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity.
Aspirin, they found, halved the activity of gastric alcohol dehydrogenase -- an enzyme that helps oxidize alcohol, preventing its absorption into the bloodstream.
Effects of H-2 receptor antagonists on gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity.