Boyle's law

(redirected from Gas laws)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Boyle's law

 [boilz]
at a constant temperature the volume of a perfect gas varies inversely with pressure; that is, as increasing pressure is applied, the volume decreases. Conversely, as pressure is reduced, volume is increased.

Boyle's law

[boilz]
Etymology: Robert Boyle, English scientist, 1627-1691
(in physics) the law stating that the product of the volume and pressure of a gas contained at a constant temperature remains constant.

Boyle's Law

the principle that the pressure of a gas varies inversely with its volume at a constant temperature. Named after Robert Boyle (1627–91).

Boyle's law

at a constant temperature and mass the volume of a perfect gas varies inversely with pressure; that is, as increasing pressure is applied, the volume decreases. Conversely, as pressure is reduced, volume is increased.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the ideal gas laws to apply, the following requirements must be met:
Assuming that the ideal gas laws apply (an assumption which is not in fact justified), then the volume [V.
Despite the fact that this calculation requires an assumption that the ideal gas laws do in fact apply, when the result shows that strictly they cannot, it does illustrate that the atomic spacing in the HIPing gas is much closer to that of a solid or liquid than to that of a gas at stp (Atkinson & Rickinson, 1991; Vogel & Ratke, 1991).
The ideal gas law can be viewed as arising from the kinetic pressure of gas molecules colliding with the walls of a container in accordance with Newton's laws.
The intention here is not to prove that the ideal gas law break down during HIPing but rather that the conditions developed are such that to the above conditions are unlikely to apply.
Walker is a member of the Oklahoma Bar Association and its Indian Law, Mineral Law, and Real Property Law Sections; of the Oklahoma City Mineral Law Society and Oklahoma City Real Property Law Society; of the Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association; and of the Oklahoma Mid-Continent Oil & Gas Association (whose Legislative, Regulatory, and Legal Committees he advises on the drafting and application of oil and gas law in Oklahoma).
com "Since establishing its library more than 30 years ago, Barrows has become the most trusted source of international oil and gas laws and contracts.
Widely known in international circles simply as "Barrows," the company follows oil and gas law contracts through contacts with governments, international companies, and an extensive network of correspondents from offices around the world.