Boyle's law

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Boyle's law

 [boilz]
at a constant temperature the volume of a perfect gas varies inversely with pressure; that is, as increasing pressure is applied, the volume decreases. Conversely, as pressure is reduced, volume is increased.

Boyle's law

[boilz]
Etymology: Robert Boyle, English scientist, 1627-1691
(in physics) the law stating that the product of the volume and pressure of a gas contained at a constant temperature remains constant.

Boyle's Law

the principle that the pressure of a gas varies inversely with its volume at a constant temperature. Named after Robert Boyle (1627–91).

Boyle's law

at a constant temperature and mass the volume of a perfect gas varies inversely with pressure; that is, as increasing pressure is applied, the volume decreases. Conversely, as pressure is reduced, volume is increased.
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