grouper

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grouper

 [gro̳p´er]
any of various usually large marine fish of the genera Epinephelus and Mycteroperca, found in tropical waters; they are often eaten by humans but sometimes contain ciguatoxin and can cause ciguatera.

grouper

[grōōp′er]
any of various usually large marine fish of the genera Epinephelus and Mycteroperca, found in tropical waters. They are often eaten by humans, but sometimes contain ciguatoxin and can cause ciguatera.
References in periodicals archive ?
See Nuno Garoupa & Tom Ginsburg, The Comparative Law and Economics of Judicial Councils, 27 BERKELEY J.
See Garoupa & Gomez Liguerre, supra note 152, at 315 (noting that tort and contract claims could not be pursued concurrently).
Cooter & Nuno Garoupa, The Virtuous Circle of Distrust: A Mechanism to Deter Bribes and Other Cooperative Crimes, (Berkeley Program in Law and Economics, Working Paper Series, Paper No.
I wish to acknowledge the comments of Dhammika Dharmapala, Nuno Garoupa, Wade Martin, two referees, and participants in the University of Connecticut, Economics Department, Brownbag Workshop.
33) On the trade-offs involved in law enforcement, see generally Nuno Garoupa, The Theory of Optimal Law Enforcement, 11 J.
To our knowledge, though, the study of Dharmapala and Garoupa (2004) is the only prior work that addresses the normative issue of optimal hate crime policy.
Nuno Garoupa & Tom Ginsburg, Guarding the Guardians: Judicial Councils and Judicial Independence, 57 AM.
Friedman Allison Kelly-Hawke Harvard University Suffolk University Hiroshi Fujiki Jyoti Khanna Bank of Japan Colgate University Murray Fulton Henry Kinnucan University of Saskatchewan Auburn University Ed Funkhouser Francis Koh California State University, Singapore Management University Long Beach Chris Garbacz Winston Koh Mississippi Public Service Singapore Management University Commission Nuno Garoupa Ulrich Kohli Universidade Nova de Lisboa Schweizerische Nationalbank Kishore Gawande Pravin Krishna Texas A & M University Brown University Norman Gemmell Kenneth N Kuttner University of Nottingham Federal Reserve Bank of New York Donna Gilleskie Douglas J.
See generally Nuno Garoupa & Carlos Gomez Liguerre, The Syndrome of the Efficiency of the Common Law, 29 B.
Schelling (1967), Buchanan (1973), Backhaus (1979), Gambetta and Reuter (1995), and more recently Garoupa (2000) investigate the optimal public policy toward organized crimes through a welfare comparison between a monopoly (organized criminals) and competitive supplies (individual criminals).
See, for example, Garoupa (1997) or Polinsky and Shavell (2000a).