Gamgee


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Gam·gee

(gam'jē),
Joseph Sampson, British surgeon, 1828-1886. See: Gamgee tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the War of the Rings, it is Meriadoc Brandybuck who slays the Witch-King of Morgul, and Samwise Gamgee who kills the Giant Spider, Shelob.
This cedar-clad shed has a secret door, a kitchen and a fireplace - no doubt the envy of avid gardener Samwise Gamgee.
Who'' and "Torchwood'' fame, as well as Malcolm "The Dark Archer'' Merlyn on "Arrow''), Jason Momoa (Khal Drogo of "Game of Thrones'' and the rumored Aquaman in the much anticipated "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice''), Sean Astin (Samwise Gamgee of "The Lord of the Rings'' trilogy) and James Marsters (Spike of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer'' and "Angel'') are among the celebrity guests at this year's Boston Comic Con.
In the induction room, the patient is also wrapped in a mummified manner with Gamgee Tissue to prevent hypothermia and reduce the risk of burns resulting from direct contact of cables with skin.
Sam Gamgee, the archetypal working class Hobbit, (13) is elected mayor for seven seven-year terms.
It was funded in 1873 by Joseph Sampson Gamgee, an eminent surgeon at Queen's Hospital in Birmingham whose name inspired that of JRR Tolkien's T hobbit.
The combination of marriage-plot, domesticity, and Sam's rapid social and political rise (even seen in his surname-change from Gamgee to the more aristocratic-sounding and less parodic Gardner) are juxtaposed with the troubling transformation of the Shire, once thought to be inherently free from evil, but now its repository.
Working alongside Dr Ryan is her assistant Elliot, who's played by none other than Sean Astin, who's perhaps best known for playing Samwise Gamgee in the Lord of the Rings trilogy.
Top of the list has to be Sean Astin (Samwise Gamgee from 'Lord of the Rings').
About 22otters 22otters is a mobile patient engagement platform from Gamgee, a producer of leading-edge mHealth technology.
Alaric Hall, lecturer in medieval literature, said a later version of the song - called e Root Of e Boot - appeared in e Lord of the Rings book, recited by Samwise Gamgee.
It is Sam Gamgee that articulates this perspective on the stairs of Cirith Ungol when he relates the history of Middle-earth from the travails of First Age heroes right up to the stellarized Earendil and concludes: "And why, sir, I never thought of that before