game theory

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game the·o·ry

the branch of mathematical logic concerned with the range of possible reactions to a particular strategy; each reaction can be assigned a probability and each reaction can lead to a counter-reaction by the "adversary" in the game. Used mainly in systems analysis, game theory has some applications in disease surveillance and control; it is one of the underlying theories in clinical decision analysis.

game theory

a branch of mathematical logic which deals with all of the possible reactions to a particular strategy used mainly in systems analysis.
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The game-theoretic analysis of this game is no different from the one-stage dictator game: according to backward induction Player 1 can induce that Player 2 in self-interest would keep all the money received, and therefore should send nothing.
In this work (1), we build two-party secure set-intersection protocol in game-theoretic setting using cryptographic primitives.
Next, part four presents a generalized partnership-game model and explains the possible application of this game-theoretic model to public-private contracts in the water sector.
On the basis of Table 3, we can distinguish between the predictions of the two theoretical approaches: the game-theoretic solutions GT based on risk neutrality, risk aversion, or CRRA (constant relative risk aversion as elaborated in Appendices B and C), and the equity-theoretic solution based on the total expected profit (ET).
He now argues against this assumption by claiming that the interrogative model, because it incorporates IF logic, makes it possible to treat the two contexts in the same logical and game-theoretic manner.
The decades since Olson (1965) have witnessed an explosion of applied game-theoretic models of a number of incentive problems that are relevant to collective action.
Chua (2003) uses a multi-person game-theoretic framework to explain why an individual chooses to share knowledge even though he/she belongs to an organization whose culture discourages knowledge sharing.
From a game-theoretic perspective, competitors solve a specified game that has an equilibrium condition in the form of Nash equilibrium or its refinements (sub-game perfection).
In contrast, the central tendencies of the price distribution for the No Tracking-High Search treatment are considerably greater than the static symmetric game-theoretic predictions.
Moreover, it is also rather cumbersome to translate their model into standard game-theoretic terms.
Wantchekon and Healy (1999) develop a game-theoretic model of torture that has yet to be tested empirically.