game theory

(redirected from Game-theoretic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia.

game the·o·ry

the branch of mathematical logic concerned with the range of possible reactions to a particular strategy; each reaction can be assigned a probability and each reaction can lead to a counter-reaction by the "adversary" in the game. Used mainly in systems analysis, game theory has some applications in disease surveillance and control; it is one of the underlying theories in clinical decision analysis.

game theory

a branch of mathematical logic which deals with all of the possible reactions to a particular strategy used mainly in systems analysis.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Bayesian Game-theoretic Modeling of Transmit Power Determination in a Self-organizing CDMA Wireless Network", Proc.
This is a type of subgame for which a rich game-theoretic literature exists, and one example of where existing game-theoretic work could be used to inform the gaming.
One can adduce that certain coordination problems impinged on postwar American society to an unprecedented extent from the words, metaphors, and analogies with which mathematicians started to describe game-theoretic situations.
Doyle, "A game-theoretic model for medium access control," in WICON '07, Austin, Texas, USA, 2007.
In this work (1), we build two-party secure set-intersection protocol in game-theoretic setting using cryptographic primitives.
Next, part four presents a generalized partnership-game model and explains the possible application of this game-theoretic model to public-private contracts in the water sector.
Chua (2003) uses a multi-person game-theoretic framework to explain why an individual chooses to share knowledge even though he/she belongs to an organization whose culture discourages knowledge sharing.
From a game-theoretic perspective, competitors solve a specified game that has an equilibrium condition in the form of Nash equilibrium or its refinements (sub-game perfection).
The author begins with Bodel's 1202 play Le Jeu de Saint Nicolas, involving the dice game "hasard," a game whose complex rules are only partially known today; he then advances to the 1640s and Pascal's well-known wager, presented in the Pensees as a game-theoretic argument why even atheists should live as if they believe in God.
The model builds on the work of Bellman and Zadeh (1970), who analyze decision making in a fuzzy environment, and extends it to a game-theoretic setting.
The game-theoretic assumptions about an agent's knowledge of the environment, the options, and the fellow players are also criticized as too formalized.
Ankum, 1993, "A Real Options and Game-Theoretic Approach to Corporate Investment Strategy Under Competition", Financial Management, 22:241-250