Galenism


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Galenism

(gā′lə-nĭz′əm)
n.
The medical system based on the theories or practices of Galen.

Ga′len·ist adj. & n.

Galenism

Medical theory and practices as taught by the Greek physician Claudius Galen ca. 130–200. Galen brought some science into medicine but was mistaken in many of his ideas. His influence was so great that for 15 centuries it was considered heretical to question his dicta. Many important advances, such as the concept of the circulation of the blood and the appreciation of the dangers of blood-letting, were thereby delayed.
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19) On the one hand, it might be argued, as Laurence Brockliss has done with regard to France, that in Scotland the professional appropriation of mineral waters 'played a definite role in the dethronement of Galenism as the establishment medical orthodoxy'.
To Singer, Vesalius was a very characteristic produce of his time, having as father the galenism, and mother, the beautiful creature--the new Art, during the flourishment of her youth.
Poynter finds it ironic that Cole authenticates Culpeper's alchemical work with drinkable gold while simultaneously accentuating his return to Galenism, Poynter, "Culpeper and the Paracelsians," 214; Mr.
More complex than mere syncretization, the authors in this volume argue, transformations within the Irish medical world over the course of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries reflect the intersection of indigenous medical culture with a truly international intellectual culture in the wake of the scientific revolution and the collapse of Galenism.
Though it is now close to a commonplace that Galenism understood the individual in the Latinate meaning of that term--as undivided, in this case, from environment--I want to focus particularly on the means of monitoring and regulating that ail-inclusive system, namely on dietetic medicine, and particularly on the manipulation of the six non-naturals that helped to maintain a homeostatic balance both within the individual and between the individual and the environment of which he or she was a part.
In direct challenge to the humoral therapeutics of Galenism, Paracelsus and his followers introduced new, often toxic, chemicals into medical use.
The second chapter on Spenser and Harvey, for instance, no sooner begins than Spiller turns to Thomas Laqueur, Stephen Greenblatt, the transvestite theater, and, finally, a critique of Laqueur's overemphasis on Galenism at the expense of Aristoteleanism.
That "pre-scientific activity" withered and died when the link between "traditional natural philosophy" and Galenism dissolved and new theories--including (iatro)mechanism--replaced it as the use of vernacular languages in learning almost simultaneously supplanted Latin.
In this way, English Galenists not only adjusted but also sometimes radically inverted the dietary theory of classical Galenism, adapting ancient Greek ideas based upon ancient Greek food products and eating habits to conform to then-traditional English dietary conventions.
Nonetheless, Lindemann does chart a kind of progress: by the end of the eighteenth century "physicians throughout most of Europe had shed the successive skins of Galenism, iatrochemistry, and iatromechanism.
Coupling these discourses means critiquing their distinct, and shared, limitations, which is probably not very unsettling for scholars interested in Galenism, since humoral theory has been safely relegated by science to the category of metaphor or associative--rather than diagnostic--understanding.
The third chapter deals with the relationships between Christianity and medicine, charity and early hospitals, and then the formation and spread of Galenism.