gal.

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gal.

abbr.
gallon
References in periodicals archive ?
The Galatians have been so changeable because of Judaizer agitators, against whom Paul had pronounced anathema (1: 8-9), so now, in the epilogue, he wishes upon them peace and mercy, if they follow the rule of the gospel.
Reading Galatians 3:28 in the Context of Women in the Church of Christ in Zimbabwe
In Galatians, it leads to the question of the relative value of the old and new covenants.
Just as Theodore interprets the content of the book of Galatians as a whole in light of the basic categories of his theological vision, so his interpretation of individual verses sheds light on his distinctive approach.
Turning to early church fathers such as Tertullian, Origen, and Athanasius, Longenecker's interpretive effort in chapter 7 examines their discussion of Galatians 2:10.
In Galatians 3:8, Paul quotes a portion of this same scripture: "The scripture foresaw that God would justify the Gentiles by faith and announced the gospel in advance to Abraham: "All nations will be blessed through you.
In his call to renewal for the Galatians, plagued as they were with false teachings, Paul makes the magnificent statement: "There is no longer Jew or Greek, there is no longer slave or free, there is no longer male and female, for all of you are one in Christ Jesus" (Gal.
Galatians 6:10 (New Living Translation) HOW often have you felt called to help someone or to do something good for others but you failed to take action?
I think that Paul's letter to the Galatians, through its emphasis on freedom, can inform a diaspora identity and, I will argue, a diaspora mission.
I would suggest these people read the whole book of the Bible particularly Revelation 2 verses 20-23, Roman 1 verses 19-32, Galatians five verses 17-21, and 1 Corinthians Chapter five.
As a young Bible college student, my favorite verse was Galatians 3:28, where God pronounced everyone equal ("in Christ there is neither male nor female, Jew nor Greek, bond nor free").
While often quoting 1 Timothy 2:12, Titus 2:1-10, and other contextual statements made by Paul, Deweese points out that opponents of the ordination of women rarely quote Paul's "Freedom Manifesto" found in Galatians 3:28.