Galapagos Islands

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Galapagos Islands

a group of 15 islands in the Pacific Ocean situated on the equator some 900 miles west of Ecuador. In 1835, Charles DARWIN visited the islands during his voyage on the Beagle and the fauna particularly influenced his views on evolution. According to his theory GEOGRAPHICAL ISOLATION has influenced divergence of different forms so that, for example, DARWIN'S FINCHES have all probably evolved from a common ancestor, and now occupy numerous niches on the islands due to the absence of competition from other birds. Marine iguanas and giant tortoises are other interesting animals found there, and in the absence of palms and conifers, the normally small prickly-pear cactus has reached tree-like proportions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Regional biogeography of shallow reef fish and macro-invertebrate communities in the Galapagos archipelago.
Taxonomy, distribution and ecology of the lycosid spiders occurring on the Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos Archipelago, Ecuador.
In seven days we visited 10 of the 13 islands in the Galapagos Archipelago and saw clear evidence of species uniquely adapted to the different island habitats, which Charles Darwin drew upon for his scientific theory, The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection (1859).
The Galapagos archipelago has long been a destination for tourists with an ecological or scientific bent, but the habitat is rapidly changing.
When food is scarce, being small means a better chance of survival-at least for grazers that include marine iguanas in Ecuador's Galapagos archipelago.
We reexamined geographic factors explaining the number of plant species on islands in the Galapagos Archipelago.
Charles Darwin was only 26 years old on October 8, 1835, when he disembarked on the James Island (San Salvador Island), in the heart of the Galapagos Archipelago.
Although Smithsonian-based marine biologist Carol Baldwin is the key human subject here, the real hero is Charles Darwin, whose 1835 exploration of the Galapagos archipelago marked the beginning of what is still the most revolutionary concept in the history of scientific reseach: natural selection, and how species adapt and evolve to survive among themselves and in their environment.
The find "shows that the Galapagos archipelago existed in its present [form] since at least 14.
Also contains additional maps, Toshio Asaeda's watercolor portraits of the fish of the Galapagos Archipelago, and live recordings of songs for many birds described in the text.
Compiled and illustrated by Darwin's contemporaries, the Zoology is complemented by Toshio Asaeda's 1932 watercolor portraits of Galapagos Archipelago fish.