Gaia hypothesis


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Gaia hypothesis

(gī′ə)
n.
1. A hypothesis stating that Earth's biota constitute a single interconnected system that affects or determines the physical and chemical conditions within the biosphere, including such conditions as global temperatures, the composition of the atmosphere, and the salinity of seawater.
2. Any of various related hypotheses stating that this system is self-regulating, as through feedback loops, or that it constitutes a living organism, in either case acting to maintain stable conditions that are optimal for the continuation of life.
Gaia is the theoretical opposite of Darwinism; it postulates that living organisms control and modify the relative compositions of the sea, air, and environment
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Russians did not anticipate all aspects of the Gaia hypothesis, but they were in a good position to embrace it and further develop it.
According to the Gaia hypothesis all physical surroundings,
The Gaia hypothesis - first articulated by James Lovelock and Lynn Margulis in the 1970s - holds that Earth's physical and biological processes are inextricably connected to form a self-regulating, essentially sentient, system.
The Gaia hypothesis -- first articulated by James Lovelock and Lynn Margulis in the 1970s -- holds that Earth's physical and biological processes are inextricably connected to form a self-regulating, essentially sentient, system.
Along the way, this history of the WEC touches on appropriate technology, geodesic domes, "access to tools," the Gaia hypothesis, Jerry Brown, the birth of personal computing, and the foundations of environmental consumerism at Ben & Jerry's, Patagonia, and Apple Computer.
Examples of subjects tackled by the volumes include alien abductions, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, chaos theory, drugs and direct-to-consumer advertising, the Gaia hypothesis, genetically modified organisms, green building design, information technology, intellectual property, medical marijuana, parapsychology, quarks, reproductive technology, research ethics, the scientific method, urban warfare, virtual reality, waste management, and wind energy.
The Gaia hypothesis is a scientific theory, developed by Lynn Margulis and James Lovelock, that claims the Earth acts as a living being in which all systems work together to regulate the climate.
I will summarize the various schools of contemporary environmental ethics, including anthropocentric and biocentric theories, the Gaia hypothesis, and other current variations.
He evokes the Gaia hypothesis to explain that these millions of organizations and the passionate individuals involved in them are acting as an immune system fighting off disease.
James Lovelock, the father of the Gaia hypothesis, said that the earth has a fever, and predicted that a warmer planet would be unlikely to support more than 500 million humans.
At age 87, James Lovelock remains the indefatigable proponent of the Gaia hypothesis, which depicts Earth as a living entity.
Indeed, people like James Lovelock, who formulated the 60's Gaia Hypothesis about the planet's self-regulating nature, are making very dark predictions regarding the Earth's attempts to restore its equilibrium.