Gaia hypothesis

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Related to Gaia Theory: deep ecology

Gaia hypothesis

(gī′ə)
n.
1. A hypothesis stating that Earth's biota constitute a single interconnected system that affects or determines the physical and chemical conditions within the biosphere, including such conditions as global temperatures, the composition of the atmosphere, and the salinity of seawater.
2. Any of various related hypotheses stating that this system is self-regulating, as through feedback loops, or that it constitutes a living organism, in either case acting to maintain stable conditions that are optimal for the continuation of life.
Gaia is the theoretical opposite of Darwinism; it postulates that living organisms control and modify the relative compositions of the sea, air, and environment
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James Lovelock's Gaia Theory fitted well with Teddy's ideas on the emergent properties of systems and as Jim lived near Camelford, where we were at the time publishing The Ecologist, we decided to hold a symposium on the implications of the Gaia Theory for ecology and the environment.
GAIA theory, scientific insights and a focus on a living earth make for wonderful, revealing reading in his new book.
He's a critic of the current notions of development and his position springs from an extensive knowledge of the science of climate change and an unimpeachable reverence for the interconnectedness of life on the planet, as articulated in his Gaia theory, combined with an alarm at the complacency around the seriousness of global warming.
If you don't know, suffice it to say that the Gaia Theory would seem to apply, which makes for a rather flat denouement.
Visits from big scientific names of today are also in the pipeline and include James Lovelock, author of the Gaia theory of an "oragnic" Earth, and astronomer Sir Fred Hoyle.
Scharper sees -- for those who wish to read deeper -- antecedents to the Gaia theory in the work of G.
Finally, geophysiology, including Gaia theory, has reworked the biosphere into the most ancient and powerful of all living forms -- something so much greater than the human that it can evoke a religious response.
The Gaia Theory is still controversial, but I think the system's approach and perspective on life IS an important one.
Lovelock and Margulis are early NASA astrobiology investigators and co-developers of the Gaia theory, which proposes that Earth and all of its life forms function as a single interconnected system.
Lovelock, who 40 years ago originated the idea that the planet is a giant, self-regulating organism - the so-called Gaia theory, added that he has little sympathy for the climate scientists caught up in the UEA email scandal.
capitalism, trade, corporations, civil societies, knowledge and ethics, specific topics include globalization and environmental protection on the high seas, renewable energy and international politics, rethinking environmental security, how nature nurtures civil violence, global environmental governance, the promise of the social economy, transnational corporations, trade and international organizations, environmental citizenship, vulnerability, integrated water sources management, and Gaia theory.