Gaenslen's test


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Gaenslen's test

A clinical test used to identify sacroiliac (SI) joint dysfunction.

Technique 
The patient lies supine, close to the side of the examination table. The examiner allows the near leg to hang over the side of the table, and instructs the patient to actively flex the other leg to his or her chest and hold it; stabilising the patient, the examiner applies pressure to the near leg, forcing it into hyperextension.

Positive test
Pain implies SI joint dysfunction.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sacroiliac joints were examined using Patrick's FABER (Flexion, ABduction, and External Rotation) test, anterior posterior pelvic pressure over the anterior superior iliac spine, lateral pelvic compression, direct pressure over the sacroiliac joints and Gaenslen's test (Table 1).
Joint assessments used Peripheral Cervical Thoracic 68/66 count Occiput-to-wall distance Chest expansion Tragus-to-wall distance Goniometric assessment Lumbar Sacroiliac Modified Schober test Patrick's FABER test Fingertip-to-floor Anterior posterior pelvic distance pressure Lateral flexion Lateral pelvic compression Direct pressure over the sacroiliac joints Gaenslen's test Table 2.
Only 3 examination maneuvers mildly reproduced the patient's LBP: Gaenslen's test on the right, femoral nerve stretch on the right, and active lumbar extension.
To elicit pain at the SI joints, Flexion-Abduction-External Rotation (FABER) test, Distraction test and Gaenslen's test were carried out.
Positive findings on at least one of the following three provocation tests for SIJ pain: (i) Gaenslen's test in which the hip joint is flexed maximally on one side, and the opposite hip joint is extended, stressing both sacroiliac joints simultaneously), (12) (ii) Patrick's test [flexion, abduction external rotation (FABERE) test], (13) (iii) Newton's test (thigh hyperflexion test), (14) a negative response to Kemp's test, (15) one of the pain provocation tests for sciatica (Patient's trunk rotates obliquely downward in the affected lumbosacral area.
Posterior shear test (8), Gaenslen's test (8) and Yeoman's tests (8) were non-provocative.
45) The flexibility of the psoas major muscle can be further assessed with orthopaedic testing using the Thomas test, Yeoman's test or Gaenslen's test.
Orthopedic examination including Gaenslen's test, Yeoman's test, Faber-Patrick test and thigh thrust test was negative.