GRATEFUL MED


Also found in: Acronyms.

GRATEFUL MED

Medical informatics User-friendly software that facilitates literature searches and accessing data from the National Library of Medicine's database, MEDLARS; MEDLARS' most popular database is MEDLINE
References in periodicals archive ?
With the release of MEDLINE/PubMed, NLM provided MEDLINE for free for the first time, and, like Grateful Med, it required no special training.
Rural GRATEFUL MED outreach: Project results, impact, and future needs.
During one-month trial periods at each of the hospitals, project participants learned the basics of database organization, search strategy preparation and controlled vocabulary use, as well as the mechanics of searching NLM's databases by using the menu-driven computer software package developed for Grateful MED.
The volume concludes with two case studies, the first on the development of GRATEFUL MED, the National Library of Medicine front-end software for microcomputers.
based NLM files, sells the Grateful Med front-end search software, offers database training and support, runs an online-based document delivery service, and is currently beta-testing a BBS and E-mail system for the medical community.
Later as a prolific user of Grateful Med, I accumulated articles of greater relevance, but they remained in similar disarray.
Even though the NLM did not introduce its own system for end-users, GRATEFUL MED, until 1986, the phenomenon had become widespread through such commercial systems as BRS AFTERDARK, Dialog's Knowledge Index, BRS Colleague, and Paperchase, an NLM grant-developed system.
Because of the availability of CD-ROM reference sources, in-house databases, and end-user MEDLINE interfaces such as GRATEFUL MED, much effort in library instruction centers on teaching computer searching skills.
where he was responsible for the introduction of the personal computing package, GRATEFUL MED, and the implementation of the MEDLARS 3 production system.
As the new end-users, particularly those who searched infrequently, complained about the "user hostile" nature of the original command language software, a number of more "user friendly" interfaces were developed such as PaperChase, GRATEFUL MED, BRS Colleague, and DIALOG's Knowledge Index.
Users who have more complicated searching needs could learn to use the "advanced search" options in US Health Link, or could get their own account with the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and use GRATEFUL MED software from the NLM to do their searching (software available for approximately $30; call 1-800-638-8480 for information).
Smith also said that since Grateful Med is such an easy to use interface to these databases, the use has grown dramatically from a few thousand in early 1987 to well over 16,000 in 1989.