GRAS List

GRAS List

A list of food additives generally recognized as safe by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
See: food additive
References in periodicals archive ?
The FDA recently removed partially hydrogenated oil from the list of food additives "generally recognized as safe," commonly called the GRAS list.
Currently there is debate over whether certain food ingredients, including partially hydrogenated oils (trans fat), caffeine, salt, and sugar, grandfathered in 1958, should remain on the GRAS list.
Not all colorants have been tested for specific medical device applications, though they may be on the GRAS list (Generally Recognized as Safe).
But the FDA's GRAS list includes the two most harmful substances in our food supply--salt and partially hydrogenated oil--although each causes fatal heart attacks in tens of thousands of people a year.
Items on the GRAS list are those "Generally Recognized As Safe.
All wetted materials are GRAS list and FDA CFR21 compliant, and measurements are made using non-contact tordial sensing techniques.
They were previously on the GRAS list but were banned when evidence indicated they may cause cancer in animals.
All flavor components contained in this yeast-based product are approved for use in a regulation of the FDA or occur on the FEMA GRAS list.
The GRAS list was established with the 1958 Food Additives Amendment to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.
However, those reactions don't mean that MSG should be taken off the GRAS list, regulated more tightly, or banned, she says.
The FDA took all amino acids off the GRAS list in 1973.
It published a GRAS list that, by mistake, included tryptophan, and it took six months to correct the error.