privacy

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pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē),
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

privacy

[prī′vəsē]
a culturally specific concept defining the degree of one's personal responsibility to others in regulating behavior that is regarded as intrusive. Some privacy-regulating mechanisms are physical barriers (closed doors or drawn curtains, such as around a hospital bed) and interpersonal types (lowered voices or cessation of smoking).
enlarge picture
Privacy curtains help ensure patient's privacy

privacy

Seclusion, freedom from disturbance or interference. Privacy has two intertwined components in the context of healthcare:
(1) The patient’s rights and expectations that personal health information is shared only between professionals who need it to manage the patient; in the UK access to such information is monitored by the provider’s Caldicott Guardian; and
(2) The physical space, clothing and other measures taken to ensure that the private conversations remain so, and that patients’ dignity is preserved and embarrassment minimised by providing appropriate clothing.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, PRIV uh see
Medspeak-US: pronounced, PRY vuh see

privacy

NIHspeak Control over the extent, timing, and circumstances of sharing oneself–physically, behaviorally, or intellectually with others

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, but also in all fields of dentistry and health care, respect for confidential nature of the clinician-patient relationship.

privacy,

n a culturally specific concept defining the degree of one's personal responsibility to others in regulating behavior that is regarded as intrusive.

Patient discussion about privacy

Q. I am upset by the lack of privacy at dialysis centers. Does anyone see their nephrologist in private office? My nephrologist comes to see me and examine me while I am receiving dialysis. I understand his talking to me but the exam is objectionable and I am unable to ask personal questions because everyone is listening. I am told they are all old and don't hear us but that is patronizing and extremely rude. Are there rules against this? Why can't we have office visits where there is some privacy?

A. I live in Sault Ste Marie Ontario Canada and if you need to ask personal questions you can make an appointment to see your doctor in the clinic.
But when I was in Calgary Alberta they would make you a appointment every 3 months to see the doctor.

More discussions about privacy
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, the GLBA appears to have been effective at generating new customers for financial institutions as a result of their products being marketed by other businesses.
Just as GLBA has not transformed the majority of financial services firms into one-stop-shops, it has not created the type of product integration across insurance, banking and securities, that some expected.
Therefore, we find that the OCC has implicit interpretive authority under the GLBA.
He said Section 92 of the National Bank Act provides OCC with "explicit authority to regulate the sale of insurance by national banks located in small towns" and the GLBA expands that authority to nationwide sale of insurance by national banks.
While the GLBA ultimately confirms the Federal Reserve as the umbrella supervisor of both FHCs and BHCs, it limits the Fed authority with provisions on "functional regulation.
Although a majority of financial holding companies in the Sixth District and the United States are currently not engaged in any GLBA activities, the financial holding company designation will allow bank holding companies to respond more quickly to market developments and opportunities.
The notices required by GLBA generally require disclosure to the client of categories of nonaffiliated third parties to whom there is disclosure of nonpublic information, under section 313.
Their wide selection of GLBA related services includes: Information Security Risk Assessment, Information Security Program, Security Controls Implementation, Security Testing, and Monitoring and Updating.
PointSecure helps to ensure compliance with corporate security policies and governmental regulations such as HIPAA, GLBA, and BS779.
As federal legislation, the GLBA prohibits any institution that provides financial products or services from sharing its customers' non-public, personal information with non-affiliated third parties unless the institution first discloses its privacy policy to consumers and allows them to 'opt out' of that disclosure.
In further regard to GLBA, BISA supports the full application of GLBA to the business of real estate brokerage and management and all businesses determined pursuant to GLBA to be financial services.
Special event programs also include an intensive one-day summit focused on how to implement and maintain compliance with SOX, HIPAA, GLBA and other existing and emerging laws - without overwhelming your department or your organization, and a CISO Executive Summit, where attendees will discover how their peers from diverse industries tackle and manage their security challenges.