CXCR6

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CXCR6

A gene on chromosome 3p21 that encodes a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family which is a receptor for chemokine CXCL16 and a coreceptor for strains of HIV-2 and m-tropic HIV-1.
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Their therapeutic target is supported by the fact that they have proven that when G protein-coupled receptor 3 production is increased it corresponds with the progression of the condition in postmortem brain tissue from two separate groups of Alzheimer's disease patients.
It was reported on Friday that the G protein-coupled receptor has been delivered as part of the company's antibody therapeutics alliance.
The company is using its large portfolio of patented G protein-coupled receptor targets to design improved drugs and to map biological pathways that may offer new ways to treat diseases.
I believe that this strategy will optimize the value of our large portfolio of patents and at the same time allow for the greatest proliferation of Synaptic's know-how in functional genomics in the G Protein-Coupled Receptor field.
G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) belong to the family of membrane receptors and constitute one of the main classes of therapeutic targets for many indications.
Shi, "Role of G protein-coupled receptors in control of dendritic cell migration," BioMed Research International, vol.
About 30 percent of all prescription drugs affect cells via G protein-coupled receptors.
San Diego, CA) has patented a method for using sensory G protein-coupled receptors that recognize chemical sensants, particularly those involving olfactory and taste receptors; polypeptide fragments and mutants thereof; classes of such receptors; polynucleotides encoding such receptors, fragments and mutants thereof, and representatives of receptor classes; genetic vectors including such polynucleotides; and cells and non-human organisms engineered to express such receptor complexes, fragments and mutants of an olfactory or taste receptor, and representatives of receptor classes to simulate sensory perception of odorants and tastants is described.
The work is particularly exciting because it offers the first glimpse into an important, but scientifically elusive family of human proteins called G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs).
These gene families, which include G protein-coupled receptors, ion channels, kinases, nuclear receptors, phosphatases, phosphodiesterases, transporters, and proteases, contain the genes of greatest interest to the pharmaceutical industry as new drug targets.
Heptares Therapeutics, a clinical-stage company creating novel medicines targeting G protein-coupled receptors in the United Kingdom, has collaborated with the University of Cambridge.

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