Fusobacterium


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Related to Fusobacterium: Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Fusobacterium necrophorum

Fusobacterium

 [fu″so-bak-tē´re-um]
a genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria found as normal flora in the mouth and large bowel and often in necrotic tissue, probably as secondary invaders. Species include F. gonidiafor´mans and F. morti´ferum (occurring in respiratory, urogenital, and gastrointestinal infections); F. necro´phorum (occurring in disseminated infections involving necrotic lesions, abscesses, and bacteremia); and F. navifor´me, F. nuclea´tum, F. rus´sii, and F. va´rium (occurring in abscesses and other infections).

Fusobacterium

(fyū'zō-bak-tēr'ē-ŭm),
A genus of bacteria containing gram-negative, non-spore-forming, nonmotile, obligately anaerobic rods that produce butyric acid as a major metabolic product. These organisms are found in cavities of humans and other animals; some species are pathogenic. The type species is Fusobacterium nucleatum.
[L. fusus, a spindle, + bacterium]

Fusobacterium

/Fu·so·bac·te·ri·um/ (fu″zo-bak-tēr´e-um) a genus of anaerobic gram-negative bacteria found as normal flora in the mouth and large bowel, and often in necrotic tissue, probably as secondary invaders. F. necroph´orum is found in abscesses of the liver, lungs, and other tissues and in chronic ulcer of the colon.

fusobacterium

/fu·so·bac·te·ri·um/ pl. fusobacte´ria  
1. A rod-shaped bacterium in which the cell is thicker in the center and tapers toward the ends.
2. an organism of the genus Fusobacterium.

Fusobacterium

a large cigar-shaped anaerobic bacillus genus, only some of which are pathogenic to humans. F. fusiforme is found in cavities of humans and other animals. It is sometimes associated with Vincent's angina. F. nucleatum is associated with pleuropulmonary infection and disease and also is one of the causes of gingivitis.

Fu·so·bac·te·ri·um

(fū'zō-bak-tēr'ē-ŭm)
A genus of bacteria containing gram-negative, non-spore-forming, obligately anaerobic rods that produce butyric acid as a major metabolic product. These organisms are found in cavities of humans and other animals; some species are pathogenic.
[L. fusus, a spindle, + bacterium]

Fu·so·bac·te·ri·um

(fū'zō-bak-tēr'ē-ŭm)
A genus of bacteria containing gram-negative, non-spore-forming, nonmotile, obligately anaerobic rods; found in oral cavities of humans and other animals; some species are pathogenic.
[L. fusus, a spindle, + bacterium]

Fusobacterium

a genus of anaerobic non-spore-forming, gram-negative bacteria found as normal flora in the mouth and large bowel, and often in necrotic tissue, probably as secondary invaders.

Fusobacterium equinum
contributes to necrotizing pneumonia and pleurisy in horses.
Fusobacterium necrophorum
found in abscesses of the liver, lungs and other tissues and in chronic ulcer of the colon. A common major participant in bovine footrot, calf diphtheria, ruminal necrobacillosis, hepatic abscesses and thrush in horses. Synergistic with Dichelobacter nodosus in ovine footrot. Divided into subspecies necrophorum, formerly biotype A, which is especially found in liver abscesses of cattle, and subspecies funduliforme, formerly biotype B, which is particularly found in ruminal abscesses and in ruminal contents.
Fusobacterium nodosus
Fusobacterium nucleatum
isolated from cat and dog bite wounds.
Fusobacterium russii
isolated from cat and dog bite wounds.
References in periodicals archive ?
Increased diagnosis of Lemierre syndrome and other Fusobacterium necrophorum infections at a Children's Hospital.
2,9) The most frequently reported anaerobes include Peptostreptococcus, Prevotella, Fusobacterium, Propionibacterium and Bacteroides.
of Isolates Aerobic and facultative Gram-positive cocci GABHS 22 Viridans streptococci 24 Streptococcus nonspeciated 6 Micrococcus species 9 Coagulase negative Staphylococcus 3 Staphylococcus aureus 2 Streptococcus mitis 1 Gram-negative cocci Neisseria species (nonpathogenic) 6 Gram-negative bacilli Eikenella species 2 Haemophilus parainfluenzae 2 Haemophilus influenzae (nontypeable) 1 Klebsiella pneumoniae 1 Gram-negative bacilli (nonlactose fermenter) 1 Gram-positive bacilli Corynebacterium species 4 Total number of aerobes 84 Anaerobic Anaerobic cocci Peptostreptococcus species 2 Gram-negative bacilli Prevotella species 8 Prevotella intermedia 2 Bacteroides species 2 Fusobacterium varium 2 Prevotella oralis 1 Total number of anaerobes 17
Investigators at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute discovered abnormally large number of Fusobacterium cells in nine colorectal tumour samples.
aureus with Tet (K) MDR pump Tea catechin Oxacillin MRSA Totatrol Methicillin MSSA, MRSA Berberine 5'-Mehoxyhydnocarpin Nor (A) mutant (Berberis plant) Green tea extract Levofloxacin Escherichia coli 0157 in gnotobiotic mouse model Craneberry juice - Helicobacter pylori extact Blueberry, Grape seed and oregano extract Oregano and Lactic acid Vibrio cranberry extract parahemolyticus Isoflavone Mupirocin MRSA Bidwillon B from Erythrina variegata [alpha]-Mangostin Vancomycin MRSA and Vancomycin enterococci Gentamycin Aqueous crude Tetracycline Streptococcus sanguis, khat extracts Fusobacterium nucleatum Corilagin from [beta]-Lactams such as MRSA Arctostaphylos oxacillin.
Fusobacterium necrophorum and P melaninogenica were the most common anaerobic organisms isolated (~38% each).
Anaerobic bacteria cultured from lymph nodes included Fusobacterium spp.
The organism most commonly implicated in Lemierre syndrome is Fusobacterium necrophorum, (3) which is a strictly anaerobic, nonmotile, Gram negative bacillus.
THE EFFECTS OF XYLITOL ON FUSOBACTERIUM NUCLEATUM BIO FILM FORMATION.
In the ceaca, there is a shift from Lactobacillus to Clostridia, then Eubacteria and Fusobacterium species with increasing age.
Serum antibodies of periodontitis patients compared to the lipopolysaccharides of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum [Electronic version].
The study conducted by Yiping Han from the Department of Periodontics at Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine, has appeared in the article, "Term Stillbirth Caused by Oral Fusobacterium nucleatum," in the February issue of Obstetrics and Gynecology.