furanocoumarin

(redirected from Furanocoumarins)

furanocoumarin

(fyūr-a-nō-kū-mah'rinz),
Member of a group of chemical compounds found in grapefruit, which includes bergamottin and 6'7'-dihydroxybergamottin. Inhibit CYP450 3A4, particularly in the GI tract.
See also: bergamottin.

furanocoumarin

naturally occurring photodynamic substances in plants and probably fungi. See also furocoumarin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Its sap is toxic and contains chemicals known as furanocoumarins.
Coumarins can be categorized into simple coumarins, pyranocoumarins, furanocoumarins, chromones and dimeric coumarins.
Synthesis and antifungal activity of coumarins and angular furanocoumarins.
Insecticidal effect of phthalides and furanocoumarins from Angelica acutiloba against Drosophila melanogaster.
Anticonvulsant activity of furanocoumarins and the essential oil obtained from the fruits of Heracleum crenatifolium.
Aflatoxin which is a group of polyketide-derived furanocoumarins (3) produced by a poliketide pathway and has toxigenic, mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic properties and it's in toxication can result in death by suppressing the immune response (4).
4) Additionally, Seville oranges and the pomelo (a large, sweet grapefruit-like citrus fruit) also contain furanocoumarins and could have a similar effect, warranting caution with certain medications.
LIPID-ALTERING AGENTS Grapefruit and grapefruit (statins): Lower production of juice contain furanocoumarins, LOL (bad) cholesterol and a compound that slows statins' triglycerides (fat in the breakdown in the body and may blood) and raise HDL (good) trigger side effects such as cholesterol, which reduces the digestive issues, muscle risk of heart attack and aches, increased blood sugar, stroke.
Giant hogweed sap contains toxic chemicals known as photosensitising furanocoumarins, which react with light when in contact with human skin, causing blistering within 48 hours.
The problem with grapefruit, according to Gmitter, is a family of organic chemical furanocoumarins believed to inhibit enzymes from breaking down certain medication, leading to drugs entering the blood stream in higher concentrations than intended, causing an overdose.
Grapefruit juice, however, contains natural chemicals, furanocoumarins, that inhibit an enzyme found in the gut that ordinarily kicks off the metabolism of about half of all drugs taken by mouth.