mycosis

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Related to Fungus infection: fungal diseases

mycosis

 [mi-ko´sis]
any disease caused by fungi.
mycosis fungoi´des a chronic or rapidly progressive form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (formerly thought to be of fungal origin), which in some cases evolves into generalized lymphoma. It may be divided generally into three successive stages: premycotic, associated with intensely pruritic eruptions; infiltrated plaques, or mycotic, characterized by the presence of abnormal mononuclear cells (Sézary cells); and mushroom-like tumors that often ulcerate. The tumor stage (d'emblée type) may develop without preceding lesions or prodromal symptoms.
opportunistic mycosis a fungal or funguslike disease occurring as an opportunistic infection. Fungi that may become opportunistic pathogens include species of Aspergillus, Candida, Mucor, and Cryptococcus. Successful treatment of opportunistic mycoses depends on identification of the specific organism causing the infection. Without effective therapy a systemic infection of this type can be fatal.

my·co·sis

, pl.

my·co·ses

(mī-kō'sis, -sēz),
Any disease caused by a fungus (filamentous or yeast).
[myco- + G. -osis, condition]

mycosis

/my·co·sis/ (mi-ko´sis) any disease caused by fungi.
mycosis fungoi´des  a chronic, malignant, lymphoreticular neoplasm of the skin and, in late stages, lymph nodes and viscera, with development of large, painful, ulcerating tumors.

mycosis

(mī-kō′sĭs)
n. pl. myco·ses (-sēz)
1. A fungal infection in or on a part of the body.
2. A disease caused by a fungus.

mycosis

[mīkō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, mykes + osis, condition
any disease caused by a fungus. Some kinds of mycoses are candidiasis, coccidioidomycosis, and tinea pedis. mycotic, adj.

mycosis

A fungal infection; the most common mycosis in the US is candidiasis, caused by C albicans, commonly vaginal in adult ♀, oral in children, and esophageal in AIDS and immunocompromise

my·co·sis

(mī-kō'sis)
Any disease caused by a fungus (filamentous or yeast).
[myco- + G. -osis, condition]

mycosis

(mī-kō′sĭs) [″ + osis, condition]
Any disease induced by a fungus, or resembling a fungal disease.

mycosis fungoides

Abbreviation: MF
Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, esp. when the disease is first clinically apparent on the skin. The skin is marked by irregularly shaped macules, plaques, or nodules, which usually first appear on the trunk and may sometimes cause considerable itching. The rash may be difficult to diagnose or may be misdiagnosed as another form of dermatitis. Biopsy specimens may reveal atypical-appearing lymphocytes in the epidermis or collections of malignant lymphocytes in clusters called Pautrier's microabscesses. Eventually (e.g., 10 or more years after diagnosis), the malignant cells disseminate throughout the skin and into lymph nodes and internal organs.

Treatment

Topical nitrogen mustard, phototherapy with psoralens and ultraviolet light, systemic chemotherapy, interferons, extracorporeal phototherapy, and electron beam radiation of the skin have all been used. The disease may be curable when treated in its very earliest stage.

NOTE

The name “mycosis fungoides” is deceptive, as the disease is not fungal in origin.

superficial mycosis

Any of a group of fungus infections of the skin. Included in this group are erythrasma, tinea barbae, tinea capitis, tinea corporis, tinea cruris, tinea favosa, tinea pedis, tinea unguium, and trichomycosis axillaris.
Enlarge picture
SYSTEMIC MYCOSIS: Cryptococcosis of lung; arrows indicate fungus (orig. mag. ×450)

systemic mycosis

Any of a group of deep fungus infections involving various bodily systems or regions. Included in this group are aspergillosis, blastomycosis, chromoblastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, cryptococcosis, geotrichosis, histoplasmosis, maduromycosis, moniliasis, mucormycosis, nocardiosis, penicilliosis, rhinosporidiosis, and sporotrichosis. See: illustration
illustration

mycosis

Any disease caused by a fungus.

mycosis

an animal disease caused by fungal infection.

mycosis

any disease caused by fungi

my·co·sis

(mī-kō'sis)
Any disease caused by a fungus (filamentous or yeast).
[myco- + G. -osis, condition]

mycosis

(mīkō´sis),
n a disease caused by a yeast or fungus.

mycosis

pl. mycoses; any disease caused by fungi.

dermal mycosis
see ringworm, epizootic lymphangitis, sporotrichosis, swamp cancer. Called also dermatophytosis.
mycosis fungoides
a chronic, malignant, lymphoreticular neoplasm of the skin, and, in late stages, lymph nodes and viscera; a type of cutaneous lymphosarcoma involving T lymphocytes. It occurs in humans, dogs and cats.
guttural pouch mycosis
see guttural pouch mycosis.
opportunistic mycosis
a fungal or fungus-like disease occurring in an animal with a compromised immune system. Opportunistic organisms are normal resident flora that become pathogenic only when the host's immune defenses are altered, as in immunosuppressive therapy, in a chronic disease, such as diabetes mellitus, or during steroid or antibacterial therapy that upsets the balance of bacterial flora in the body.
superficial mycosis
those involving the superficial layers of the skin; typical of infections caused by dermatophytes.
systemic mycosis
fungal infection spread via the bloodstream and characterized by multiple granulomatous lesions in many organs. See aspergillosis, blastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, cryptococcosis, histoplasmosis, mucormycosis.

Patient discussion about mycosis

Q. What is the best way to treat fungal infection so it wont come back every year at the same time?? I don't know where I got it from- maybe caught it in a public shower,some people say it develops while the foot is in the shoe for long hours- I'm not sure- but every fall, for like 5 years now, I've been having this fungal infection in a few spots in my feet. usually in the same exact spots and ewvery year another one show up. what to do to make it go away?? it's real ugly and itchy, can't stand it. any help would be appreciated...

A. i also used to have fungal infections (Athlete's foot). i just applied a topical anti fungal cream to treat it and then continued applying it for prevention and started to use sandals in public showers. and thank god, i don't have any now.

More discussions about mycosis
References in periodicals archive ?
These are based on his decades-long experience in treating fungus infections.
Combined with the rising temperature of the water due to the humidity, the fish have developed bacteria and fungus infections.
Antibiotic use among OC users is not uncommon, such women being more susceptible to bacterial, yeast, and fungus infections, secondary to OC use.
That cost advantage is documented, but some recent generations of washables have been chemically treated to reduce bacterial and fungus infections and to neutralize ammonia and its odor.
The active ingredient in Mycocide NS Antifungal Treatment has been recommended by physicians for years as safe and effective in treating fungus infections.
2) Consequently, a radiologist studying such an MRI can easily underestimate the presence of chronic dissected secretions and fungus infections and ultimately the severity of the sinus disease.
Within an hour or two of getting them home the mollies developed fungus infections - no doubt stressed out by the Man-in-Charge's driving - and so began the cycle of water treatment, water changes, charcoal removal and worry.
This helps explain the longevity of her dogwood, which, quite frequently, succumbs to root fungus infections due to standing water.
With an estimated 40 million people in the US suffering from toenail fungus infections, PathoLase is committed to making our PinPointe FootLaser system available to as many sufferers as quickly as we can throughout the US," noted John Strisower, CEO of PathoLase.
Athlete's foot: Occurs when chronic perspiration softens the outer skin and allows fungus infections to develop.
Nystatin topical powder is the generic version of Westwood-Squibb's Mycostatin(R) topical powder; an antibiotic used in the treatment of diaper rash associated with bacterial, yeast or fungus infections.
and Asian health-care authorities to investigate a growing number of fungus infections among contact-lens wearers.