fungus

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fungus

 [fun´gus] (pl. fun´gi) (L.)
any member of the kingdomfungi, a group of eukaryotic organisms that includes mushrooms, yeasts, and molds, which lack chlorophyll, have a rigid cell wall in some stage of the life cycle, and reproduce by means of spores. Fungi are present in the soil, air, and water, but only a few species can cause disease. Types of fungal disease (see mycosis) include histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, ringworm, athlete's foot, and thrush. Although the fungal diseases develop slowly, are difficult to diagnose, and are resistant to treatment, they are rarely fatal except for systemic mycotic infections, which can be life-threatening, especially for immunocompromised patients (see opportunistic mycosis).
cutaneous fungus dermatophyte.

fun·gus

, pl.

fun·gi

(fŭng'gŭs, fŭn'jī),
A general term used to encompass the diverse morphologic forms of yeasts and molds. Originally classified as primitive plants without chlorophyll, the fungi are placed in the kingdom Fungi and some in the kingdom Protista, along with the algae (all but the blue-green algae), the protozoa, and the slime molds. Fungi share with bacteria the important ability to break down complex organic substances of almost every type (cellulose) and are essential to the recycling of carbon and other elements in the cycle of life. Fungi are important as foods and to the fermentation process in the development of substances of industrial and medical importance, including alcohol, the antibiotics, other drugs, and foods. Relatively few types of fungus are pathogenic for humans, whereas most plant diseases are caused by fungi.
[L. fungus, a mushroom]

fungus

/fun·gus/ pl. fun´gi   [L.]
1. any organism belonging to the Fungi.
2. anything resembling such an organism.

dimorphic fungus  one that lives as a yeast or mold, depending on environmental conditions.
imperfect fungus  one whose perfect (sexual) stage is unknown.
perfect fungus  one for which both sexual and asexual types of spore formation are known.
true fungi  Eumycota.

fungus

[fun′gəs] pl. fungi,
Etymology: L, fungus, mushroom
a eukaryotic, thallus-forming organism that feeds by absorbing organic molecules from its surroundings. Fungi lack chlorophyll and therefore are not capable of photosynthesis. They may be saprophytes or parasites. Unicellular fungi (yeasts) reproduce by budding; multicellular fungi, such as molds, reproduce by spore formation. Fungi may invade living organisms, including humans, as well as nonliving organic substances. Of the 100,000 identified species of fungi, 100 are common in humans and 10 are pathogenic. See also fungal infection. fungal, fungous, adj.

fun·gus

, pl. fungi (fŭnggŭs, -jī)
A general term used to encompass the diverse morphologic forms of yeasts and molds. Originally classified as primitive plants without chlorophyll, the fungi are placed in the kingdom Fungi and some in the kingdom Protista, along with algae, protozoa, and slime molds. Fungi share with bacteria an ability to break down complex organic substances and are essential to the recycling of carbon and other elements. Fungi are important as foods and to the fermentation process in the development of substances of industrial and medical importance, including alcohol, the antibiotics, other drugs, and antitoxins. Relatively few fungi are pathogenic for humans, whereas most plant diseases are caused by fungi.
[L. fungus, a mushroom]

fungus

(pl. fungi) an organism that may be unicellular or made up of tubular filaments (HYPHAE) and lacks CHLOROPHYLL. The cell wall usually contains CHITIN. Fungi live entirely as SAPROPHYTES or PARASITES. They can generally reproduce by means of asexual SPORES, although many have a sexual method of reproduction as well. The Fungi are a KINGDOM ofMICROORGANISMS. Two divisions have been proposed in some classifications: the EUMYCOTA, the true fungi, and the MYXOMYCOTA, the slime moulds, although the latter are sometimes grouped with the PROTISTA. However, on the basis of genetic structures and sequences these divisions may both be of kingdom status within the DOMAIN EUCARYA (see CLASSICATION). The fungi (true fungi) are divided into a number of PHYLA, including the ASCOMYCOTA, BASIDIOMYCOTA, ZYGOMYCOTA and DEUTEROMYCOTA.

Fungus

A single-celled or multi-celled organism without chlorophyll that reproduces by spores and lives by absorbing nutrients from organic matter.

fun·gus

, pl. fungi (fŭnggŭs, fŭnjī)
A general term used to encompass the diverse morphologic forms of yeasts and molds. Fungi share with bacteria the important ability to break down complex organic substances of almost every type; important as foods and to the fermentation process in the development of substances of industrial and medical importance, including alcohol, the antibiotics, other drugs, and foods. Relatively few types of fungus are pathogenic for humans.
[L. fungus, a mushroom]

fungus (fung´gəs),

n a class of vegetable organisms of a low order of development, including mushrooms, toadstools, and molds. Examples include
Candida albicans and
Histoplasma, Trichophyton, Actinomyces, and
Blastomyces organisms. Oral and systemic moniliasis (thrush) is produced by overgrowth of
C. albicans, which is a normal resident in the oral cavity. When the patient's health is compromised, the organism may assume a pathogenic role (opportunistic infection).

fungus

pl. fungi [L.] a general term for a group of eukaryotic organisms (mushrooms, yeasts, molds, etc.) marked by the absence of chlorophyll, the presence of a rigid cell wall in some stage of the life cycle, and reproduction by means of spores. Fungi are present in the soil, air and water, but only a few species can cause disease. Among the fungal diseases (mycoses) are histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis and ringworm. Although the fungal diseases develop slowly, are difficult to diagnose, and are resistant to treatment, they are rarely fatal.
Another important section of the disease spectrum caused by fungi is the mycotoxicoses, e.g. facial eczema, ryegrass staggers, mushroom poisoning—amanita, ramaria, clavaria, cortinarius, clitocybe, inocybe, psilocybe, sclerodermia.

dimorphic fungus
those with two growth forms, molds or yeasts, depending on whether they are grown on artificial media or occur in the environment or in tissues or alternatively, depending on the incubation temperature. Included are Sporothrix schenckii, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. These organisms typically cause deep or systemic mycoses in animals and humans.

Patient discussion about fungus

Q. How to treat toenail fungus? I have two badly infected toes on one foot (a problem of several years) and two more are growing in with fungus. How can I treat it without oral medicine?

A. there are topical treatments for fungus. but first of all- avoid humidity as much as you can. air it up and use Clotrimazole or Miconazole both topical. it'll take you about 6 months of 2-3 times a day of cleaning and applying cream to get rid of it.
good luck!!

Q. How to treat toenail fungus? I have two badly infected toes on one foot (a problem of several years) and two more are growing in with fungus. How can I treat it without oral medicine?

A. fungal infection sometimes can be tricky. if it happens often, consider to check your blood glucose level (diabetic people tends to be vulnerable to a development of fungus).

agree with dominicus, apply some anti-fungal (ketoconazole) cream on it, and manage as best as you can to prevent much moisture in that area. and make sure you wash your daily socks, hehe..
you can also have the cure more quickly by also consuming oral anti-fungal (why don't you want to consume it?)

okay, good luck, and stay healthy always..

Q. what natural cure for toe nail fungus really works?

A. Haven't heard about anything natural that was actually provent in reliable, well controlled trial. Especially since natural medications usually aren't tested in this way, I'm not sure there can be an accurate and true answer for this question.

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