keratomycosis

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Related to Fungal keratitis: fungal infection, Acanthamoeba keratitis

keratomycosis

 [ker″ah-to-mi-ko´sis]
fungal disease of the cornea.

ker·a·to·my·co·sis

(ker'ă-tō-mī-kō'sis),
Fungal infection of the cornea.

keratomycosis

/ker·a·to·my·co·sis/ (-mi-ko´sis) fungal infection of the cornea.

keratomycosis

[-mīkō′sis]
a fungal disease of the cornea.

keratomycosis

Fungus infection of the CORNEA.

keratomycosis

A fungus infection of the cornea, which may result in keratitis and ulceration. It is usually introduced by injury and is characterized by an ulcer, which appears as a fluffy white elevated protuberance surrounded by a shallow crater on the edge of which is a sharply demarcated halo. There is ciliary and conjunctival injection. Diagnosis is best provided by laboratory analysis of a specimen of these fungal organisms, which are obtained by scraping the base of the ulcer. See fungal keratitis; corneal ulcer.

keratomycosis

fungal disease of the cornea and usually conjunctiva. Occurs mainly in horses; introduced by foreign bodies.
References in periodicals archive ?
1 ml injected in a grid pattern circumferentially around the infiltration in the corneal stroma in recalcitrant fungal keratitis.
et al there was uneven distribution of fungal keratitis throughout the year with peaks in July and January.
DISCUSSION: Fungal keratitis is common in India due to the tropical climate and a large agrarian population that is at risk with an incidence of approximately 33.
Chapters 5 & 7, Bacterial and Fungal Keratitis.
In India, these two species are reported to be the most common agents of fungal keratitis in the study of Bharathi et al 2001.
25%, (1,3) that shows KOH wet mount preparation as a reliable criterion for the diagnosis of fungal keratitis.
The clinical diagnosis of fungal keratitis was based on risk factor identification and characteristic non-specific and specific corneal features.
16) reported that CXL performed in addition to medical therapy successfully controlled infection in 34 of 40 eyes with keratitis (24 bacterial keratitis, 7 fungal keratitis, 2 protozoal keratitis, 1 viral keratitis, 6 unknown; 18% of eyes had keratoplasty).
sup][3] Fungal keratitis is the combined result of pathogen and host factors, such as long-term use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, dysbacteriosis in the conjunctival sac, or application of corticosteroids, leading to local hypoimmunity or corneal trauma cases.
Fungal keratitis is an uncommon disease in avian patients.
Several patients used traditional medications prior to arrival with one subsequently contracting fungal keratitis and one can only assume the number who self-treat and never seek care.
Two culture negative patients were given natamycin and amphotericin, respectively, as fungal keratitis was suspected.