residency

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residency

(rĕz′ĭ-dən-sē, -dĕn′-)
n. pl. residen·cies
The position or term of a medical resident.

residency

Medical education A period of formal graduate medical education that consists of on-the-job training of medical school graduates; completion of a residency program is required for board certification in a medical or surgical specialty. See Fellowship, GME, Internship, Resident. Cf CME, Extern, Intern.

residency

A period of at least 1 year and often 3 to 7 years of on-the-job training, usually postgraduate, that is part of the formal educational program for health care professionals.
References in periodicals archive ?
A group discussion session was held in which children learnt about 41 fundamental Rights of the Children.
The statement of objects and reasons of the Bill states that under Article 1(c) of the Constitution the federally administered tribal areas also constitute the territory of Pakistan and its people entitled to the same protection of fundamental rights as are guaranteed to the people of other parts of the country.
Guardianship, Findings of Incapacity, and Regulation of Fundamental Rights
Viviane Reding, Vice-President of the European Commission and EU Commissioner responsible for Justice, Fundamental rights and Citizenship.
Ashfaq Saleem Mirza, senior human right activist emphasized over collective and concrete efforts in order to encourage teaching and research on fundamental rights.
My point respecting the antebellum courts is highlighted in Earl Maltz's excellent analysis of antebellum usage of the terms fundamental rights or privileges and immunites.
These three "founding fathers" shared the similar views that one of the most fundamental rights in the new American republic was that of the Freedom of Religion; that no government official (or anyone else) should be able to interfere with any citizen's free exercise of whatever their religious beliefs and practices should be; that the newly formed United State of America should not adopt any religions as "official"; that federal tax dollars should never be allocated to the support of any particular church or support any specific religious group; that all of the different religions, Christian or non-Christian should be respected; and that the doctrine of Church/State separation should be maintained from the local municipal level to that of the national government.
Students from Florida State University's College of Law are working to restore fundamental rights for people with past felony convictions.
Virginia officials argued that RLUIPA violated the First Amendment by providing greater protection to inmates' religious liberty rights than other fundamental rights, such as free speech rights.
This violates our fundamental rights and our spiritual rights.
The court also found that the section of RLUIPA that increased the level of protection of prisoners' religious rights only, while excluding other equally fundamental rights from strict scrutiny review, violated the Establishment Clause.
Second, in many legal systems, including American law, the prohibition against violating fundamental rights has a constitutional character, and applies to the legislature itself, and in any case has greater force.
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