fundamental particle

(redirected from Fundamental particles)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Fundamental particles: Higgs boson

fun·da·men·tal particle

(fŭn′də-mĕn′tl)
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the Standard Model - a theoretical model which describes the fundamental particles and forces that control the Universe - the Higgs boson provides mass to all other particles.
Information has even more universal character than mass, because a number of fundamental particles, such as photon, have no mass at all.
Quantum chromodynamics is a non-Abelian gauge field theory that can describe the strong interactions of fundamental particles, he explains, and he introduces the field to first-year graduate students, introducing gauge theory as a whole at the same time.
At a time when the Large Hadron Collider is set to give us a far more complete understanding of fundamental particles, the Hubble shows us just how big the universe is and technology and medical sciences help thinking people to more clearly understand the world around them, religious zealots prefer to avoid thinking about real science because "believing" is so much easier.
Now we are finally about to see first data emerging as part of a 20-year programme of discovery, which we fully expect to completely revolutionise our understanding of fundamental particles and forces.
Its discovery also would be one more stitch tying down the Standard Model, the theory-in-progress that currently explains how the 12 fundamental particles of matter and all but one of the four fundamental forces are tied together.
At its core, string theory suggests that fundamental particles are not zero-dimensional points, but one-dimensional lines of vibrating energy or "strings.
The frequency of these fundamental particles, often of cesium or rubidium, creates a simple motion analogous to that of a sonic wave--a correlation that anticipates French artist Davide Balula's coupling of sound and time.
Marshall recognizes that fundamental particles we know are electric monopoles and/or magnetic dipoles, but dark matter might contain the converse particles.
A handful of black-and-white diagrams and photographs illustrate this fascinating tour of scientific theory, recommended for anyone with even the most casual interest in understanding the fundamental particles composing the Universe.
Theoretical physics tries to explain the enormous complexities of the universe in terms of basic fundamental particles.

Full browser ?