fugue

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Related to Fugues: fugal, Fugue state, Tetu

fugue

 [fūg]
a pathological state of altered consciousness in which an individual may act and wander around as though conscious but his behavior is not directed by his complete normal personality and is not remembered after the fugue ends.
dissociative fugue (psychogenic fugue) a dissociative disorder characterized by an episode in which an individual forgets his past, assumes a partial or complete new identity, and travels away from home or work, in some cases taking up a new name, occupation, and lifestyle. During the fugue, patients are unaware that they have forgotten anything and seem to other people to be behaving normally; following recovery, they recall nothing that happened during the fugue. The disorder is usually related to emotional conflicts due to some traumatic, stressful, or overwhelming event, remits spontaneously, and rarely recurs.

fugue

(fyūg),
A condition in which a person suddenly abandons a present activity or lifestyle and starts a new and different one for a period of time, often in a different city; afterward, the person has amnesia for events occurring during the fugue period, although earlier events are remembered and habits and skills, and procedural memory, are usually unaffected.
[Fr. fr. L. fuga, flight]

fugue

(fūg) a pathological state of altered consciousness in which an individual may act and wander around as though conscious but their behavior is not directed by their complete normal personality and is not remembered after the fugue ends.
dissociative fugue , psychogenic fugue a dissociative disorder characterized by an episode of sudden, unexpected travel away from home or business, with amnesia for the past and partial to total confusion about identity or assumption of a new identity.

fugue

(fyo͞og)
n.
Psychiatry A dissociative state, usually caused by trauma, marked by sudden travel or wandering away from home and an inability to remember one's past.

fu′gal (fyo͞o′gəl) adj.
fu′gal·ly adv.
fugue v.
fugu′ist (fyo͞o′gĭst) n.

fugue

[fyo̅o̅g]
Etymology: L, fuga, running away
a state of dissociative reaction characterized by amnesia and physical flight from an intolerable situation. During the episode the person appears normal and seems consciously aware of what may be very complex activities and behavior, but afterward he or she has no recollection of the actions or behavior. The condition may last for only a few days or weeks, or it may continue for several years, during which the person wanders away from the customary environment, enters a new occupation, and undertakes an entirely different way of life. The syndrome appears to be caused by an inability to cope with a severe conflict or with a chronically stressful life situation. A form of fugue also occurs briefly after an epileptic seizure. See also ambulatory automatism, automatism, dissociative disorder.
Neurology A state in which the patient denies memory of activities for a period of hours to weeks; to external appearances, these activities were either completely normal or the patient disappeared and travelled extensively; most are functional; short fugues rarely occur in temporal lobe epilepsy
Psychiatry A state of personality dissociation characterised by amnesia and possibly physical flight from the customary environment or field of conflict

fugue

(fyūg)
A condition in which a person suddenly abandons a present activity or lifestyle and starts a new and different one, often in a different city; afterward, alleges amnesia for events occurring during the fugue period, although earlier events are remembered and habits and skills are usually unaffected.
[Fr. fr. L. fuga, flight]

fugue

A rare psychological reaction to an intolerable situation in which the affected person wanders away from the old environment, apparently in a state of AMNESIA, and takes on a new identity, occupation and life. The loss of memory is selective and does not preclude use of the previous education. If there is recovery from the fugue, amnesia for the period of the fugue occurs.

Fugue

A dissociative experience during which a person travels away from home, has amnesia for their past, and may be confused about their identity but otherwise appear normal.

fugue (fyōōg),

n dissociative response in which an individual experiences amnesia and physically flees specific circumstances. Person may exhibit normal reactions to the situation but will have no recollection of the event or his response.
References in periodicals archive ?
196) -- the rationale behind his support for performers to add expressive gestures not necessarily marked in the score but perhaps implied through their own programmatic readings of it) -- with the fact that the preludes and fugues "possess neither an official nor a 'sub-textual' program" (p.
Elsewhere there's the Fantasia and Fugue in G minor (shapeless in places), 13 chorale preludes (some not very memorable) and various other pieces.
The elegiac tread of the fourth fugue came shaded with just the right touch of melancholy and the longbreathed fantasia of the fifth prelude sang its beguiling melody above a smartly stepping bass line.
Here, we find fugues and ricercares of clearly drawn character that also provide a musical and technical bridge to the art of high baroque counterpoint.
Kandinsky and Braque were both into Bach's fugues, which were receiving renewed attention around the turn of the century, following the Wagnerian vogue for his choral music.
Most challenging to normative modes of meaning-making--and perhaps therefore the most rewarding poems--are the sprawling multivocal fugues in "Two Fugues and a Prayer" the penultimate section, while more conventionally accessible favorites include "Almost Pregnant," "Designer Bag and All," "Olio Intaglio" and "The Weight of My Heart.
After the interval John returns to the organ to play Mozart's Fugue in G Minor, K401, Two Little Fugues, K154a and the Adagio in C for Glass Harmonica, K356.
First, a pair of Bach fugues were juxtaposed, with Wilson alone playing the Toccata and Fugue in D minor and then the Philharmonic performing Leopold Stokowski's orchestral version of the ``Little'' Fugue in G minor.
Musical Offering was the result of Bach's improvisations on a royal theme given to him by Frederick the Great, and includes two fugues, ten canons, and a trio sonata.
New commodities in trade and tariff analysis: preludes and fugues
Ritchie, Professor of Organ Emeritus at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, chose to record the later version, for which Bach revised various pieces, rearranged the order, and added new works for a total of fourteen fugues and four canons.
Bespectacled and wearing tails, cummerbund and a harassed look he pounded his way through the first three-quarters of the 24 preludes and fugues like a man in a hurry to be somewhere else.