fugue

(redirected from Fugues)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Fugues: fugal, Fugue state, Tetu

fugue

 [fūg]
a pathological state of altered consciousness in which an individual may act and wander around as though conscious but his behavior is not directed by his complete normal personality and is not remembered after the fugue ends.
dissociative fugue (psychogenic fugue) a dissociative disorder characterized by an episode in which an individual forgets his past, assumes a partial or complete new identity, and travels away from home or work, in some cases taking up a new name, occupation, and lifestyle. During the fugue, patients are unaware that they have forgotten anything and seem to other people to be behaving normally; following recovery, they recall nothing that happened during the fugue. The disorder is usually related to emotional conflicts due to some traumatic, stressful, or overwhelming event, remits spontaneously, and rarely recurs.

fugue

(fyūg),
A condition in which a person suddenly abandons a present activity or lifestyle and starts a new and different one for a period of time, often in a different city; afterward, the person has amnesia for events occurring during the fugue period, although earlier events are remembered and habits and skills, and procedural memory, are usually unaffected.
[Fr. fr. L. fuga, flight]

fugue

(fūg) a pathological state of altered consciousness in which an individual may act and wander around as though conscious but their behavior is not directed by their complete normal personality and is not remembered after the fugue ends.
dissociative fugue , psychogenic fugue a dissociative disorder characterized by an episode of sudden, unexpected travel away from home or business, with amnesia for the past and partial to total confusion about identity or assumption of a new identity.

fugue

(fyo͞og)
n.
Psychiatry A dissociative state, usually caused by trauma, marked by sudden travel or wandering away from home and an inability to remember one's past.

fu′gal (fyo͞o′gəl) adj.
fu′gal·ly adv.
fugue v.
fugu′ist (fyo͞o′gĭst) n.

fugue

[fyo̅o̅g]
Etymology: L, fuga, running away
a state of dissociative reaction characterized by amnesia and physical flight from an intolerable situation. During the episode the person appears normal and seems consciously aware of what may be very complex activities and behavior, but afterward he or she has no recollection of the actions or behavior. The condition may last for only a few days or weeks, or it may continue for several years, during which the person wanders away from the customary environment, enters a new occupation, and undertakes an entirely different way of life. The syndrome appears to be caused by an inability to cope with a severe conflict or with a chronically stressful life situation. A form of fugue also occurs briefly after an epileptic seizure. See also ambulatory automatism, automatism, dissociative disorder.
Neurology A state in which the patient denies memory of activities for a period of hours to weeks; to external appearances, these activities were either completely normal or the patient disappeared and travelled extensively; most are functional; short fugues rarely occur in temporal lobe epilepsy
Psychiatry A state of personality dissociation characterised by amnesia and possibly physical flight from the customary environment or field of conflict

fugue

(fyūg)
A condition in which a person suddenly abandons a present activity or lifestyle and starts a new and different one, often in a different city; afterward, alleges amnesia for events occurring during the fugue period, although earlier events are remembered and habits and skills are usually unaffected.
[Fr. fr. L. fuga, flight]

fugue

A rare psychological reaction to an intolerable situation in which the affected person wanders away from the old environment, apparently in a state of AMNESIA, and takes on a new identity, occupation and life. The loss of memory is selective and does not preclude use of the previous education. If there is recovery from the fugue, amnesia for the period of the fugue occurs.

Fugue

A dissociative experience during which a person travels away from home, has amnesia for their past, and may be confused about their identity but otherwise appear normal.

fugue (fyōōg),

n dissociative response in which an individual experiences amnesia and physically flees specific circumstances. Person may exhibit normal reactions to the situation but will have no recollection of the event or his response.
References in periodicals archive ?
Friel said: "We start off in the first episode and Marcella seems to be OK, but she has a fugue for the first time in months and it completely throws her as she thought she was over them.
Also of interest is the way in which Bach begins two of the fugues in book two of the WTC.
The last part seems, to echo the episode episode [E] in a fugue where the initial material is modulated and further transformed:
Further, his contention that "one would not say that the Preludes and Fugues are thoroughly conceived for the piano" (p.
As a musical form, a fugue is constructed by utilizing a "Polyphonic procedure involving a specified number of voices in which a motive (subject) is exposed, in each voice, in an initial tonic/dominant relationship, then developed by contrapuntal means" (Timothy Smith, 1996).
In the middle section of the fugue, Harrison creates rhythmic equivalents for other tonal features frequently found in fugues, including imitative motives derived from the subject, melodic sequences, and pedal points.
It is now known that much of the autograph of The art of fugue dates from around 1742, roughly the time when Bach finished compiling The well-tempered clavier, book 2.
Elsewhere there's the Fantasia and Fugue in G minor (shapeless in places), 13 chorale preludes (some not very memorable) and various other pieces.
Engels examines the preludes and fugues from both volumes of Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier, considering the music in relation to the Doctrine of Affections and how Bach used musical language to portray emotion.
The new edition includes more detailed descriptions of standard works and examines all thirty-two Beethoven Sonatas and all forty-eight Bach Preludes and Fugues.
is a recital by pianist Olli Mustonen, playing preludes and fugues by Bach and Shostakovich.